bottle tree


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Related to bottle tree: Brachychiton populneus

bottle tree

see brachychitonrupestris.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the photo, she captures the bare trees with bottles on the ends of the branches and a beautiful peach tree in full bloom next to the bottle trees (Photographs 121).
The first thing one notices approaching this picturesque building is the colorful bottle tree in the front yard, followed in quick succession by the neat white picket fence, the archway teeming with tall showy flowers, and the sky-blue exterior of the bungalow.
The planting of the bottle tree also was timed to coincide with Earth Day, Hugger said.
As autumn gives way to winter, the garden will become less active so that the rustling grasses, bottle tree, and stones are all that remain visible.
The city's urban forestry division planted Australian willow, Arizona ash, London plane, Bradford pear, Canary Island pine, California live oak, bottle trees, silk trees, valley oaks and fruitless mulberry trees.
5a and b), solitary or in small groupings, widest in diameter in the bottle trees (148 [micro]m), intermediate in slender trees (129 pm) and narrowest in stems of tuberous shrubs (40-80 [micro]m mean diameter).
Bottle trees and concrete chickens that traditionally once graced the gardens of good country folks can now be found in the gardens of sophisticated, upwardly mobile urban dwellers.
The cooled-dry conservatory, the Flower Dome, features flora from the Mediterranean and semi-arid subtropical regions, allowing nature lovers to get up close and personal with plant species like baobabs, indigenous to Madagascar, bottle trees, olive trees and date palms.
According to Rushing, gardening should be about pleasing yourself in your yard, whether your inclination is bottle trees and a flock of pink flamingoes (as is the case for the author) or a neatly curved stone path through vibrant green groundcover.
Gundaker criticizes "either/or approaches" which seek the origins of such customs as bottle trees and flowers planted in truck tires, but some at least of the cultural practices under examination are originally European.
And its sand was mixed with salt - a traditional spiritual protection (this may have been why the speaker platform suggested an altar as much as a dance-hall stage, just as the soda bottles outside recalled the bottle trees of African-American faith), but also the salt of tears, or the dried-out residue of seawater.