botfly


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Related to botfly: human botfly

botfly

 [bot´fli]
an insect of the family Oestridae whose larvae (called bots) are parasitic, especially in horses and sheep. Genera include Oestrus, Gasterophilus, and Dermatobia.

bot·fly

(bot'flī),
Robust, hairy fly of the order Diptera, often strikingly marked in black and yellow or gray, the larvae of which produce a variety of myiasis conditions in humans and various domestic animals, especially herbivores.

botfly

also

bot fly

(bŏt′flī′)
n.
Any of various stout dipteran flies of the family Oestridae, having larvae that are parasitic on mammals, including livestock and sometimes humans.

botfly

(bot'fli?)
Any of several flies of the family Oestridae and other families whose maggots (larvae) are parasitic on the skin of mammals.
See: Dermatobia; myiasis
References in periodicals archive ?
Also do not bother asking patients if they were bitten by the black adult botfly, said Dr.
[5] Various species of flies causing to provoke ophthalmomyiasis are Oestrus Ovis, Latrin Fly (Fannia), House fly and Cattle botfly. [6] Oestrus Ovis is the most common cause of Ophthalmic myiasis in man.
The botfly lays her eggs on mosquitoes, which in turn deposit them on warm-blooded mammals.
Furthermore, field studies could be conducted regarding cervid host ingestion of Cephenemyia larvae and pupae exposed to CWD prions or larvipositing within CWD-free deer by adult botfly females that formerly parasitized CWD-infected deer as larvae.
Botfly larvae were still in the doe's nose (they drop out when the body temperature cools even slightly).
Table 6-15 Zoonotic Diseases Caused by Diptera Larvae Type of Myiasis Scientific Name Dermal, cutaneous, or * Cordylobia anthropophaga (Mango fly) subdermal myiasis * Cordylobia rodhaini (New World screwworm) * Cochliomyia hominivorax (New World screwworm) * Chrysomya bezziana (Old World screwworm) * Dermatobia hominis (human botfly) Wound myiasis * Lucilia sericata and Lucilia cuprina * Sarcophaga spp.
nasalis, the throat botfly, are the two common botflies found in this country.
[a]n anticoagulant in the bat's saliva produced a steady trickle of blood that flowed freely all night long." (19) Later in the expedition, the explorers suffer from another bizarre predator--the botfly. (20) With the benefit of modern science, Mr.
Board 04 INCUBATION PERIOD AND DEVELOPMENT OF BOTFLY
The botfly lays its eggs on the inside of a horse's front legs, below the knee and above the hoof.