botfly


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to botfly: human botfly

botfly

 [bot´fli]
an insect of the family Oestridae whose larvae (called bots) are parasitic, especially in horses and sheep. Genera include Oestrus, Gasterophilus, and Dermatobia.

bot·fly

(bot'flī),
Robust, hairy fly of the order Diptera, often strikingly marked in black and yellow or gray, the larvae of which produce a variety of myiasis conditions in humans and various domestic animals, especially herbivores.

botfly

also

bot fly

(bŏt′flī′)
n.
Any of various stout dipteran flies of the family Oestridae, having larvae that are parasitic on mammals, including livestock and sometimes humans.

botfly

(bot'fli?)
Any of several flies of the family Oestridae and other families whose maggots (larvae) are parasitic on the skin of mammals.
See: Dermatobia; myiasis
References in periodicals archive ?
Also do not bother asking patients if they were bitten by the black adult botfly, said Dr.
External ophthalmomyiasis caused by sheep botfly (Oestrus ovis) larvae: a report of 8 cases.
These botfly larvae are fairly large, about 2 centimeters long, and have large oral hooklets that they attach to the stomach wall.
Other than biting and acting as vectors of disease, flies may affect humans by causing myiasis, infestation of the skin or a body orifice with fly larvae of Diptera species, which include the human botfly (Dermatobia hominis).
The fastest insect in the world is the deer botfly, at 36mph.
HOW IT GETS THERE: Female botfly lays eggs on a mosquito's abdomen.
Sometimes a planter's wife might hire a schoolboy or scholar-vagabond, a licenciado, to read to her--as long as she's chaperoned, that is--but most know as much about reading as a botfly.
In 1924 the Russian-born British biochemist David Keilin (1887-1963) was studying the absorption spectrum of the muscles of the horse botfly, and he noticed four absorption bands that disappeared when the cell suspension was shaken in air but reappeared afterward.
But this herd, introduced 20 years ago, was nearly destroyed by a combination of cougar predation and an exotic cattle disease--a grotesque sinusitis caused by larvae from the botfly, a parasitic nostril fly.
The sheep nasal botfly (Oestrus ovis) is responsible for most cases of external ophthalmomyiasis (Mohsen Masoodi and Keramatalah Hosseini, 2004).
Doctors found a hole under a toe and a botfly maggot living in her body.