bot flies

bot flies

Flies of the genera Gasterophilus , Oestrus or Dermatobia whose larvae can burrow into human skin, eyes or nasal openings. Parasitization by fly larvae is called myiasis.
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Bot flies are a group of parasitic insects found in wild mammals.
Among all six sites, average prevalence was 71.55% and average intensity was 1.49 bot flies per individual host.
(2) Flies that cause myiasis are grouped into three families: Calliphoridae (blowflies), Sarcophagidae (flesh flies) and Oestridae (bot flies).
Parasitism of Peromyscus leucopus by bot flies (Cuterebra fontinella) may affect movements of individual mice, because these fly larvae are large relative to the size of their hosts (Scott and Snead, 1942; Dalmat, 1943; Wecker, 1962), and they are usually found in inguinal regions of hosts (Cogley, 1991).
The objective of this study was to assess whether movement or use of space by white-footed deermice was altered in response to infestation by bot flies. We predicted that: (1) animals would move shorter distances from their center of activity when they were infested compared to when they were uninfested, (2) animals with multiple bot fly infestations would move shorter distances from their center of activity than those that harbored a single larva and (3) individuals would have a different center of activity when infested compared to when they were uninfested.
bot flies (Diptera: Oestridae) are of interest from both the perspective of parasite/host coevolution (Colwell et al.
The bot flies deposit the larvae in and around the nostrils without alighting.
Human myiasis caused by bot flies of nonhuman animals is rare but may be increasing.
Only 2 bot flies inhabit Nearctic circumpolar regions: the Caribou bot fly (Hypoderma tarandi) and the Caribou nasal bot fly (Cephenemyia trompe), a nonhuman pathogen (2).
Bot flies, Cuterebra sp., are myiasis-producing parasites that typically infect rodents and lagomorphs (Davidson & Nettles 1988).
Similarly, Sabrosky (1986) mentioned mules as atypical hosts of these bot flies, but supportive information was not provided.