boss

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boss

 [bos]
a rounded eminence.

boss

(bos),
1. A protuberance; a circumscribed rounded swelling.
2. The prominence of a kyphosis.
[M.E. boce, fr. O.Fr.]

boss

(bôs, bŏs)
n.
A circular protuberance or knoblike swelling, as on the horns of certain animals.
Balloon Optimization vs. Stent Study. A trial comparing short- and long-term results of provisional stenting/optimal PTCA to elective stenting
Primary endpoints 8-month TVR
Conclusion Provisional stenting can be safely followed in treating discrete, native de novo lesions

boss

(baws)
1. A protuberance; a circumscribed rounded swelling.
2. The prominence of a kyphosis.
[M.E. boce, fr. O.Fr.]
References in periodicals archive ?
Keep in mind that it is impossible to have perfect bosses who will not fall short of their teams' expectations from time to time.
We are supposed to be the threat that keeps politicians in place, the bogeyman that keeps them awake at night, the micromanaging bosses that watch their every move.
While the public's acceptance of women as bosses (including those who prefer a female boss or say they have no gender preference) has been at the majority level since the early 1990s, change has been slow in workplaces.
Remarkable bosses make their employees feel that what they do will benefit them as much as it does the company.
Some bosses' contributions began before their protege started the international assignment.
What bosses think: Inappropriate language, reflects a lack of judgment.
They also observe that the worst bosses are unlikely to be retained.
There are "Bosses from Hell" just as there are problematic employees (and clients).
Too many bosses fail to consider how their behavior affects employees, and instead of being viewed as a compassionate, capable leader, they wind up being categorized as destructive, incompetent jerks that no one wants to work for.
Bosses and supervisors are not from another world, though some people are overawed by them as they consider them to be demigods.
Chapter six gives good advice on how workers can effectively use various types of power to their advantage in dealing with their bosses. "This is the real power--the power of the right attitude to approach conflict with professionalism." Chapter nine explains the G.R.A.C.E.