born-again

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born-again

Paranormal
adjective Referring to a life-changing religious experience, most commonly referring to born-again Christians.
 
Older adults who say they have being born again are reported to have greater atrophy of the hippocampus—the part of the brain which is critical to learning and memory—than others. The survey-based study evaluated 268 people, aged 58 to 84, about their religious affiliation, spiritual practices and life-changing religious experiences, and were followed for two to eight years; and changes in the hippocampus were monitored by MRI.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some 85 per cent of born-again voters are also white.
The most distinctive church attendance percentage in 1992 belongs to the one-fifth of the sample who claim to be born-again, as 74 per cent of them report attending weekly services.
The explanation for the change has to focus on other factors like Independents, Perot voters, as well as increased Republican support from religious groups like Catholic voters and born-again voters (ABC News National Exit Poll, 1994; New York Times, 1994).
Evangelicals or born-again voters extended Republicans' solid majorities for the four elections for which data are available, including a striking 81 per cent for George Bush in 1988 and the 62 per cent extended to Bush in the difficult three-way race in 1992.
Preliminary findings of the Voter Research and Surveys Election Exit Poll indicate that approximately 20 per cent of the electorate identified themselves as Evangelicals or born-again Christians and that three out of four of these voters supported Republican candidates for Congress (Niebuhr, 1995).
Steven Arterburn and Jack Felton(20) provide a fascinating and surprisingly unguarded look into the contemporary born-again mental health scene in Toxic Faith: Understanding and Overcoming Religious Addiction.
If one rejects their dogmatic premise that biblical doctrine and devotions cannot be injurious, Arterburn and Felton's book becomes an unwitting indictment of born-again living.
Ultimately, the new born-again Christian mental health professionals are in the business of granting dispensations--indulgences--from the many Bible teachings that are too formidable for contemporary people and that make the strain of being a modern born-again too great.
Also, I have seen no evidence that the treatment administered by the new born-again Christian mental health professionals is any less good than that of their mainstream counterparts.