born-again


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born-again

Paranormal
adjective Referring to a life-changing religious experience, most commonly referring to born-again Christians.
 
Older adults who say they have being born again are reported to have greater atrophy of the hippocampus—the part of the brain which is critical to learning and memory—than others. The survey-based study evaluated 268 people, aged 58 to 84, about their religious affiliation, spiritual practices and life-changing religious experiences, and were followed for two to eight years; and changes in the hippocampus were monitored by MRI.
References in periodicals archive ?
2015) "The Age of Evangelicalism: America's Born-Again Years by Steven Miller," International Social Science Review: Vol.
htm) Boxing News 2014: Pacquiao Considers Ditching Jessica Sanchez To Sing National Anthem In Favour Of Born-Again Pastors
He appeared to be very keen to get over his past and start a new life, which is what born-again Christianity is all about.
A 2001 Barna Group survey found that the divorce rate among born-again Christians was 33 percent, about the same as the rate for the population as a whole.
The report informed us that motorcyclists were being 'massacred' on our roads due to born-again bikers, i.
The problem was not just born-again bikers but some with little experience.
Like dam-builders, Balfour and a highly placed Chinese collaborator have set to work to stem and organize the torrential waste of meaning that was twentieth-century Shanghai and channel it into the twenty-first by way of mixed-use office towers, shopping malls, freeways, born-again trains and high profile pedestrianization.
It involves two nations: Israel and the diehard community of born-again Christians, the two redheaded stepchildren of bodies politic.
So many of the so-called ``bambies'', born-again motorbikers, are getting killed or injured that police are waging a campaign against them.
The pictures' swooping rhythms suggest a born-again Mondrian, a limbered-up version of the stiff theosophist, as if his taste for boogie-woogie had finally sunk into his hips and arms.
The turn to born-again believer only worked at first.
Born-again Christians were far more generous, though their mean dipped 19 percent lower since 1999.