bore

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Related to bores: Boreas, boils

bore

Medspeak
noun The inside diameter of a tubular structure.
 
verb To core or tunnel.
 
Vox populi
noun A person who bores, is boring.
 
verb  To make weary or distracted by being uncompelling, uninteresting or tedious.

bore

Vox populi
1. The inside diameter of a tubular structure.
2. A person who bores.

bore

1. The internal diameter of a tube.
2. To drill, e.g. into the surface of a bone or tooth.
References in classic literature ?
He who came first bore the axe upon his shoulder, and he who followed swung a huge club.
Then I saw Alcmena, the wife of Amphitryon, who also bore to Jove indomitable Hercules; and Megara who was daughter to great King Creon, and married the redoubtable son of Amphitryon.
The love they bore he could not cast away, sunlight stole in, the dark thoughts passed away, and the earth was a pleasant home to him.
He raised his hands in prayer to his immortal mother, "Mother," he cried, "you bore me doomed to live but for a little season; surely Jove, who thunders from Olympus, might have made that little glorious.
I was now near enough to my quarry to have used my bow gun; but, though I could see that Dejah Thoris was not on deck, I feared to fire upon the craft which bore her.
We had a dog who was a bore and knew it," he said, addressing her in cool, easy tones.
Momentarily baffled here, the huge elephant wheeled and bore down upon the hapless priests who had now scattered, terror-stricken, in every direction.
Her enemies could not see the activity aboard the ship nor mark her course as the swift current bore her outward into the ocean.
His new acquaintance looked as if he thought him mad; but he bore him company nevertheless.
A PEASANT had in his garden an Apple-Tree which bore no fruit but only served as a harbor for the sparrows and grasshoppers.
When the Inquiring Soul had completed his course of instruction he declared himself the Ahkoond of Swat, fell into the baleful habit of standing on his head, and swore that the mother who bore him was a pragmatic paralogism.
Then at the King's bidding Sir Bedivere raised Arthur and bore him to the water's edge.