boredom


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boredom

(bor'dom?)
A feeling of fatigue, depression, or disinterest caused by a lack of challenging or meaningful work or stimulation.
See: apathy
References in periodicals archive ?
The second reason Musk cited also has to do with battling boredom.
'Since flight delays are given, disservice may still be turned into public service by informing the passengers ahead of time so they can be productive and not paralyzed by boredom while waiting for announcements in a congested area called NAIA,' Lacson wrote on Monday.
And how can anyone -- child or adult -- claim boredom when there's so much that can and should be done?
The Scottish Government's Parent Club website is full of handy hints to help you tackle the challenges of raising kids, including battling boredom.
For the better half of the longest hour of my life, these two are running around the house hollering, "Pull over!" until the older one starts to complain of boredom. I revel in this sweet, silent flash of boredom until this nameless relative leaps from her chair to show the children that the megaphones also have a screaming alarm button.
"Feelings of boredom and regret often follow and, on top of that, a driver's circumstances can change, meaning they can get stuck with cars that no longer suit their needs."
Like many other forms of entertainment media in the twenty-first century, these sites discursively construct boredom as an unwanted experience that can be chased away through networked modes of communication.
The Space of Boredom: Homelessness in the Slowing Global Order is an engaging study detailing the daily life of homeless inhabitants of Bucharest, Romania during a period of three years from the incorporation of Romania into the European Union to the aftermath of the global financial crisis of 2008.
More accurately, I suspect the only danger with the opening episode of this four-part Victorian drama for many viewers was boredom.
A WAITER is finally retiring at 91 - two years after after placing a newspaper ad saying: "Save me from dying of boredom!" The move won widower Joe Bartley his waiting job in Paignton, Devon.
Waiting in police stations or in courtrooms, on the phone for news from loved ones, the struggle has dramatically changed the lives of those involved." Metwaly explores the existential boredom that has risen from the wake of great social transformation, and even posits that this boredom serves as means of keeping things together; boredom is all that is left in the wake of great change.
The senior researcher at the University of East Anglia's School of Education and Lifelong Learning interviewed a number of authors, artists and scientists in her exploration of the effects of boredom.