borborygmus


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Related to borborygmus: cholecystalgia

borborygmus

 [bor″bor-ig´mus] (pl. borboryg´mi)
a rumbling noise caused by propulsion of gas through the intestines; see also bowel sounds.

bor·bo·ryg·mus

, pl.

bor·bo·ryg·mi

(bōr-bō-rig'mŭs, -rig'mī),
Rumbling or gurgling noises produced by movement of gas, fluid, or both in the alimentary canal, and audible at a distance.
[G. borborygmos, rumbling in the bowels]

borborygmus

A rumbling, gurgling, “growling” stomach noise heard on auscultation of the abdomen in conditions of increased intestinal peristalsis.

borborygmus

Gastroenterology A rumbling, gurgling, tinkling–stomach “growling” noises heard on auscultation of the abdomen in conditions of ↑ intestinal peristalsis

bor·bo·ryg·mus

, pl. borborygmi (bōr-bō-rig'mŭs, -rig'mī)
Rumbling or gurgling noises produced by movement of gas, fluid, or both in the alimentary canal, and audible at a distance.
[G. borborygmos, rumbling in the bowels]
References in periodicals archive ?
Guo uses these two medicinals together, it is mainly to treat heat in the chest with cold in the stomach resulting in nausea, abdominal pain, borborygmus, and diarrhea.
The ancient Greeks tried to recreate the rumbling noise in a word and came up with Borborygmus (Bor-bor-rig-mus), this is the medical term used today to describe a rumbling tummy!
When she writes of the nostalgic past, of the judge in Cambridge, of Kalimpong's beauty, she is in danger of overwriting: "replications of gardens that segued one into the other or the swans that sailed butterflied to their reflections"; "circination"; "borborygmus." But it is petty to cavil.
A RUMBLING stomach is called borborygmus - the name refers to the sounds of intestinal movement, usually associated with gas due to swallowed air, or produced through bacterial fermentation of food.
The scientific word for this growling noise is borborygmus (bor ba RIG mas).
("Borborygmus" refers to the characteristic, often audible churnings, rumblings and gurglings of the bowels, sometimes associated with a person's habits of evaluating.
Also watch for signs of digestive upset, such as burping or flatulence (gas), borborygmus (stomach gurgling), lip licking, or heavy swallowing.
The classic text, Treatise on Febrile Diseases, recommends using the decoction for "intestinal tract with moisture, borborygmus, and diarrhea." According to the theories of TCM, the efficacy of SXD is due to "dissipation of water-dampness, harmonizing stomach, and elimination of lump."