bootstrap

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bootstrap

a method for estimating parameters by repeatedly drawing random samples, with replacement, from the collected observations.
References in periodicals archive ?
To identify factors that affect the use of financial bootstrapping methods by SMMEs in the developing economy.
None of the results from the unweighted logistic regression (i) differ substantially from the results in the regression with both population weights and bootstrapping applied (iii).
Although the bootstrap methodology appears to be a viable alternative for improving the accuracy of inferences about parameter values (Carpenter, Goldstein, & Rasbash, 2003; Shieh & Fouladi, 2002), applications of bootstrapping are rare within the multilevel arena.
The idea behind bootstrapping is that by undertaking Y, an actor creates the conditions that enable that actor to undertake some further action Z.
The term bootstrapping refers to the old paradox about people lifting themselves off the ground by pulling up on the straps on the backs of their own boots.
Using induced percentile left censoring for improved model fitting, bootstrapping methods were used for better estimating the upper percentiles (90th, 95th, and 99th) and confidence intervals for green wood strand thickness for the face layer of OSB panels.
The second section of the questionnaire asked owners to report how frequently they used 19 bootstrapping methods (1-5 Likert scale 1 = never use through 5 = often use).
Herzog and Ralph Hertwig from the University of Basel wanted to know if individuals could come up with better answers using the new technique called 'dialectical bootstrapping.
Chernick, a statistician, explores the multidisciplinary, real-world uses of bootstrapping for readers who have a professional interest in the topic but lack an advanced background in mathematics.
Bootstrapping originated with statisticians and is not new, nor is it unique to insurance.
In a few rare cases, companies are going public immediately after the bootstrapping phase--a strategy that is fraught with risk, yet can pay off handsomely.