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boot

 [bo̳t]
an encasement for the foot; a protective casing or sheath.
Gibney boot an adhesive tape support used in treatment of sprains and other painful conditions of the ankle, the tape being applied in a basket-weave fashion with strips placed alternately under the sole of the foot and around the back of the leg.
Unna's paste boot a dressing for varicose ulcers, consisting of a paste made from gelatin, zinc oxide, and glycerin, which is applied to the entire leg, then covered with a spiral bandage, this in turn being given a coat of the paste; the process is repeated until satisfactory rigidity is attained.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

boot

(būt),
A boot-shaped appliance.
[M.E. bote, fr. O.Fr.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
Computers verb To load an operating system—e.g., Windows— into the computer’s RAM or main memory, after which the computer can run applications
Drug slang verb A regional term meaning to inject a drug
Medspeak noun See Pellagrous boot
Orthopaedics noun Unna boot
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

boot

Informatics verb To load the operating system–eg, Windows, OS X into the computer's RAM or main memory, after which the computer can run applications. See Random access memory.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

boot

(būt)
A shoe, brace, or restrictive bandage used to protect and immobilize the foot and ankle.
[M.E. bote, fr. O.Fr.]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
n-dimensional bootstrap DMU sample was generated for each of the DMUs.
The Use of Bootstrap Financing Among Small Technology-Based Firms, Journal of Developmental Entrepreneurship, 9(2), 145-159.
We used STATA's ""scfboot" command with 999 bootstrap replications.
In essence, sieve bootstrap approximates a given process by a finite autoregressive process, whose order [??] = p(T) increases with the sample size T such that p(T) [right arrow] [infinity], p(T) = o(T), T [right arrow] [infinity].
To apply the bootstrap procedure, it is assumed that the original sample data is produced by the DGP and that we can simulate the DGP by using the 'new' or pseudo data set that is derived from the actual data set.
The bootstrap confidence interval (BCI) should not only reproduce results quite similar to statistical theoretical calculation but also provide adequate coverage probability.
The bootstrap approach (Efron 1979) also applies many "draws" of coefficient vectors [[beta].sub.b], to the sample observations, but variation in the coefficient vectors is obtained by re-estimating the model many times on different data samples.
While the cheapest destinations may be Congo and Iraq, the point is not dirt- cheap existence, but the most bang for your bootstrap buck.
A confidence level can be determined for the apparent change by performing a bootstrap analysis.
Although the bootstrap methodology appears to be a viable alternative for improving the accuracy of inferences about parameter values (Carpenter, Goldstein, & Rasbash, 2003; Shieh & Fouladi, 2002), applications of bootstrapping are rare within the multilevel arena.