mucus

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mucus

 [mu´kus]
the free slime of the mucous membrane, composed of the secretion of its glands, various salts, desquamated cells, and leukocytes.
cervical mucus that constituting the mucous membrane of the uterine cervix; it undergoes chemical and physical changes owing to hormone stimulation during the menstrual cycle and plays an important role in helping spermatozoa travel inwards after coitus. See also discussion of the cervical mucus method of contraception, under contraception.
fertile mucus see ovulation method of contraception.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mu·cus

(myū'kŭs), Do not confuse this noun with the adjective mucous.
The clear viscid secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting of mucin, epithelial cells, leukocytes, and various inorganic salts dissolved in water.
[L.]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mucus

(myo͞o′kəs)
n.
The viscous, slippery substance that consists chiefly of mucin, water, cells, and inorganic salts and is secreted as a protective lubricant coating by cells and glands of the mucous membranes.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mucus

A clear viscid fluid produced by various mucosae–eg, nose, mouth, throat, vagina, containing mucopolysaccharides, enzymes, IgA, and other proteins, desquamated epithelial cells, inorganic salts in fluid. See Cervical mucus.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mu·cus

(myū'kŭs)
The clear viscid secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting of mucin, epithelial cells, leukocytes, and various inorganic salts suspended in water.
[L.]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

mucus

A slimy, jelly-like material, chemically known as a MUCOPOLYSACCHARIDE or GLYCOPROTEIN, produced by the goblet cells of MUCOUS MEMBRANES. Mucus has important lubricating and protective properties. It prevents acid and enzymes from digesting the walls of the stomach and intestines. It traps fine particulate matter, including smoke, in the lungs. It lubricates swallowing and the transport of the bowel contents. It facilitates sexual intercourse.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

mucus

  1. any slimy or sticky material secreted by invertebrate animals or plants.
  2. a viscous slimy solution of the protein MUCIN secreted by the MUCOUS MEMBRANES of vertebrates.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Mucus

Thick, viscous, gel-like material that functions to moisten and protect inner body surfaces.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

mucus

A clear viscous secretion of mucous membranes consisting mainly of mucin, as well as inorganic salts suspended in water.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

mu·cus

(myū'kŭs) Do not confuse this noun with the adjective mucous.
Clear viscid secretion of the mucous membranes, consisting of mucin, epithelial cells, leukocytes, and various inorganic salts dissolved in water.
[L.]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012