bone scan

(redirected from bone scintigraphy)
Also found in: Wikipedia.

bone scan

the injection of a radioactive substance to enable visualization of a bone via the image produced by emission of radioactive particles.

bone scan

A method in which a radioactive compound—e.g., 99mTc IDA—is administered and its distribution in the body analysed by a scintillation camera for increased or decreased uptake in bone. Uptake in the bone is usually increased in infection, fractures and malignancy.

bone scan

Bone scintigraphy Nuclear medicine A method in which a radioactive compound–eg, 99mTc IDA, is administered and its distribution in the body analyzed by a scintillation camera for ↑ or ↓ uptake in bone, an indicator of infection or malignancy. Cf Skeletal survey.

bone scan

(bōn skan)
Examination of bone with a gamma camera after injection of radioactive material, to identify areas of injury, disease, or regeneration, using a gamma camera.

Bone scan

An x-ray study in which patients are given an intravenous injection of a small amount of a radioactive material that travels in the blood. When it reaches the bones, it can be detected by x ray to make a picture of their internal structure.
Mentioned in: Kidney Cancer

bone scan

a radionuclear technique (using radioactive-labelled technetium-99) used in medical investigations to visualize bone and to estimate bone density. In sport, it is used in the diagnosis of bony injury, especially for suspected stress fractures which may not show up on a conventional X-ray at an early stage. See also osteoporosis.

bone scan

technetium bone scan; see triple-phase bone scan
References in periodicals archive ?
1,9 The radiologic investigations for diagnosis are plain radiographs, MRI, Bone scintigraphy, CT scan and angiography1,7,13 The high rate of bilateral AVN (>60%) and contra-lateral occult disease warrants imaging of the unaffected hip.
10 ml op 1 2 technetium ( 9 9 m tc) medronas for bone scintigraphy lyophilisate for solution for injection 5 mg mdp (methylenediphosphoric acid) 6 ftole.
Diagnosis of bone metastasis was confirmed with whole body bone scintigraphy.
Bone scintigraphy can effectively show the extent of involvement of the disease which clearly gave a monostotic picture in our patient.
The diagnosis is based on the medical history, physical examination, radiological findings, bone scintigraphy, and computed tomography results.
Bone scintigraphy reveals partial absence of the 10th left posterior rib arch.
Radiological investigations like X rays, CT scan and bone scintigraphy are used in order to define the extent of tissues involvement.
Bone scintigraphy is not reliable for diagnosing a symptomatic accessory navicular because it has a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 50%.
Whole body bone scintigraphy demonstrated increased uptake at proximal part of right humerus (Figure 1c).
The diagnosis is based on radiological and histological findings [2]; some authors suggest that bone scintigraphy could be the gold standard to assess bone involvement [6].