bone graft


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graft

 [graft]
1. any tissue or organ for implantation or transplantation.
2. to implant or transplant such tissues. This term is preferred over transplant in the case of skin grafts. See also implant.
allogeneic graft allograft.
autodermic graft (autoepidermic graft) a skin graft taken from the patient's own body.
autologous graft (autoplastic graft) a graft taken from another area of the patient's own body; called also autograft.
avascular graft a graft of tissue in which not even transient vascularization is achieved.
bone graft bone transplanted from one site to another.
bypass graft an autograft consisting of a segment of vein or artery grafted into place in a bypass.
cable graft a nerve graft made up of several sections of nerve in the manner of a cable.
coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) see under bypass.
cutis graft dermal graft.
delayed graft a skin graft that is sutured back into its bed and subsequently used after several days.
dermal graft (dermic graft) a skin graft of dermis, used instead of fascia in various plastic procedures.
epidermic graft a skin graft in which a piece of epidermis is implanted on a raw surface.
fascia graft a graft of fibrous tissue, usually taken from the external investing fascia of the lower limb (fascia lata).
fascicular graft a nerve graft in which bundles of nerve fibers are approximated and sutured separately.
filler graft one used for the filling of defects, as the filling of depressions with fatty tissue or of a bony cyst cavity with bone chips or dried cartilage.
free graft a graft of tissue completely freed from its bed, in contrast to a flap.
full-thickness graft a skin graft consisting of the full thickness of the skin, with little or none of the subcutaneous tissue.
heterodermic graft a skin graft taken from a donor of another species.
heterologous graft (heteroplastic graft) xenograft.
homologous graft a graft of tissue obtained from the body of another animal of the same species but with a genotype differing from that of the recipient; called also allograft and homograft.
inlay graft a skin graft or mucosal graft applied by spreading the graft over a stent and suturing the graft and mold into a prepared pocket.
isogeneic graft (isologous graft) (isoplastic graft) syngraft.
lamellar graft replacement of the superficial layers of an opaque cornea by a thin layer of clear cornea from a donor eye.
mesh graft a type of split-thickness graft in which many tiny splits have been made in the skin to allow it to be stretched to cover a larger area.
Mesh skin graft applied to the leg. From McQuillan et al., 2002.
Ollier-Thiersch graft a very thin skin graft in which long, broad strips of skin, consisting of the epidermis, rete, and part of the corium, are used.
omental graft a segment of omentum and its supplying vasculature, transplanted as a free flap to another area and revascularized by anastomosis of arteries and veins.
pedicle graft pedicle flap.
penetrating graft a full-thickness corneal transplant.
periosteal graft a piece of periosteum to cover a denuded bone.
Phemister graft a bone graft of cortical bone with cancellous bone chips to enhance callus formation.
pinch graft a small piece of skin graft, partial or full thickness, obtained by elevating the skin with a needle and slicing it off with a knife.
porcine graft a split-thickness graft of skin from a pig, applied to a denuded area on a human as a temporary dressing for treatment of a severe burn.
sieve graft a skin graft from which tiny circular islands of skin are removed so that a larger denuded area can be covered, the sievelike portion being placed over one area, and the individual islands over surrounding or other denuded areas.
skin graft a piece of skin transplanted to replace a lost portion of skin; see also skin grafting.
split-skin graft (split-thickness graft) a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and a portion of dermis.
Diagram of a cross-section of the skin, demonstrating split thickness and full thickness skin grafts. From Roberts and Hedges, 1991.
syngeneic graft syngraft.
thick-split graft a skin graft consisting of the epidermis and about two thirds of the dermis.
Thiersch graft Ollier-Thiersch graft.

bone graft

bone transplanted from a donor site to a recipient site, without anastomosis of nutrient vessels; bone can be transplanted within the same person (that is, autograft) or between different people (that is, allograft).
See also: osteoplasty.

bone graft

Sterilised bony tissue, often of cadaveric origin, used to fill and/or “sculpt” bone defects.
 
Indications
Spinal fusion, revision of failed articular prostheses, filling traumatic or malignant bone defects, or periodontal defects.

bone graft

Orthopedic surgery Sterilized bony tissue, often of cadaveric origin, used to fill and/or 'sculpt' bone defects Indications Spinal fusion, revision of failed articular prostheses, filling traumatic or malignant bone defects, or periodontal defects. See Tissue bank.

bone graft

(bōn graft)
Osseous matter transplanted from a donor site to a recipient site, without anastomosis of nutrient vessels; bone can be transplanted within the same person (i.e., autograft) or between different people (i.e., allograft).

bone graft

(bōn graft)
Bone transplanted from a donor site to a recipient site, without anastomosis of nutrient vessels; bone can be transplanted within the same person (i.e., autograft) or between different people (i.e., allograft).

Patient discussion about bone graft

Q. What is a bone marrow transplant? I wanted to enter myself as a potential bone marrow donor and wanted to know first of all what bone marrow is? What does a bone marrow transplant mean and how is it done?

A. Bone marrow is a soft, fatty tissue inside the bones. This is where blood cells are produced, and where they develop. Transplanted bone marrow will restore production of white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Donated bone marrow must match the patient's tissue type. It can be taken from the patient, a living relative (usually a brother or a sister), or from an unrelated donor. Donors are matched through special blood tests called HLA tissue typing. Bone marrow is taken from the donor in the operating room while the donor is unconscious and pain-free (under general anesthesia). Some of the donor's bone marrow is removed from the top of the hip bone. The bone marrow is filtered, treated, and transplanted immediately or frozen and stored for later use. Transplant marrow is transfused into the patient through a vein (IV) and is naturally carried into the bone cavities where it grows to replace the old bone marrow.

More discussions about bone graft
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the other growth-inducing factors include the availability of advanced products in different shapes and sizes, rising prevalence of orthopedic problems and periodontal diseases, and increasing number of studies for investigating the enhancement of bioactivity of bone graft substitutes.
Imaging assessment: Bone fusion rate = number of bone graft fusion cases / total number of cases in the group x 100%.
The scaffolds, fitted with human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived mesodermal progenitor cells, were placed into a bioreactor specially designed to accommodate bone grafts with a broad range of sizes.
4 Van Gemert JTM, Van Es, Van, Cann EM, Koole R: Nonvascularized bone graft for segmental reconstruction of the mandible-A Reappraisal.
Therefore, an increase of 3 mm in width can be considered as viable in horizontal increases using a bone graft in a block extracted from the mandibular ramus, which may be a limitation in more demanding cases.
Treatment of large segmental bone defects with reamer-irrigator-aspirator bone graft: technique and case series.
Qualitative and quantitative diferences between bone graft obtained from the medullary canal (with a reamer/irrigator/aspirator) and the iliac crest of the same patient.
Autogenous, allogenic, and tissue engineered [5, 6] bone grafts are successfully used.
Since 1996, 201 residual digits of 104 patients underwent gradual distraction and bone graft with a self-designed digital external fixator (produced by Wujin No.
Following flap elevation (Figure 4) the bone graft was modified and fixed to the recipient site by using titanium mini-screws to avoid micromovements of the bone graft during healing period (Figure 5).
Although the bone graft eventually dies, it acts as a scaffold on which new bone can grow.