bolus

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bolus

 [bo´lus]
1. a rounded mass of food or pharmaceutical preparation ready to be swallowed, or such a mass passing through the gastrointestinal tract.
2. a concentrated mass of pharmaceutical preparation, e.g., an opaque contrast medium, given intravenously or swallowed.
3. a mass of scattering material, such as wax or paraffin, placed between the radiation source and the skin to achieve a precalculated isodose pattern in the tissue irradiated.
alimentary bolus the mass of food, made ready by mastication, that enters the esophagus at one swallow.

bo·lus (bol),

(bō'lŭs),
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use, such as a bolus dose of a drug injected intravenously.
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed, such as a bolus of barium for radiographic studies.
3. In high-energy radiation therapy, a quantity of tissue-equivalent material placed in the radiation beam, over the surface of the irradiated region, to increase the absorbed dose in the superficial tissues.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus

(1) Any concentrate given as a single dose to achieve an immediate effect.
(2) Any mass or globule—e.g., masticated food—in transit through a tube.

Endocrinology
An extra boost of insulin given to cover expected rise in blood glucose (sugar) such as the rise that occurs after eating.

Therapeutics
A large IV dose of a drug given all at once at the beginning of treatment, which raises the concentration in the body to a therapeutic level. In treating malignancy, prolonged IV infusions may be more effective than intermittent bolus injections.
 
Vox populi
A popular term for a hyperinfusion of information—e.g., “crash” review courses before boards exams.

bolus

1. Any concentrate given as a single dose to achieve an immediate effect.
2. Any mass or blob–eg, masticated food, in transit through a tube Endocrinology An extra boost of insulin given to cover expected rise in blood glucose–sugar such as the rise that occurs after eating Therapeutics A large IV dose of a drug given “all at once” at the beginning of treatment, which raises the concentration in the body to a therapeutic level.

bo·lus

(bō'lŭs)
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use (e.g., bolus dose of an intravenously injected drug) generally followed by smaller doses.
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed (e.g., a bolus of barium for x-ray studies).
3. In high-energy radiation therapy, a quantity of tissue-equivalent material placed next to the irradiated region to increase the dose of secondary radiation to the superficial tissues.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus

1. A chewed-up quantity of food in a state ready to be swallowed.
2. The dose of a drug injected as rapidly a possible into a vein so as to be diluted as little as possible.

bolus

a soft mass of chewed food, suitable for swallowing, shaped by the tongue in the BUCCAL cavity

bo·lus

(bō'lŭs)
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use (e.g., dose of an intravenous drug).
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]
References in periodicals archive ?
A randomized comparison of automated intermittent mandatory boluses with a basal infusion in combination with patient-controlled epidural analgesia for labor and delivery.
Our study has shown that in comparison with nalbuphine, intravenous tramadol required fewer number of rescue boluses and consumed less amount of drug to achieve satisfactory analgesia during first 12 hours postoperatively.
When epidural catheters were first introduced for labor analgesia, local anesthetic were given in boluses. These boluses were administered manually by anesthesiologists or midwives, and rather than given at timed intervals like PIEB, they were bolused on maternal request when pain returned.
In our study, the patients were being maintained with desflurane, and the inhalational boluses were administered transiently and did not lead to cardiovascular stimulation.
[8,14] This audit shows that IV boluses of low-dose insulin can be successfully used to treat DKA, regardless of severity.
Table IV.- Effect of trace mineral boluses on colostrum composition of Naemi ewes raised under intensive system.
The moisture contents of food samples and boluses on a wet weight basis were determined by measuring the weight difference before and after drying at 105[degrees]C in an air oven (AACC method 45-30).
Arwyn was keen to assess the potential impact of using trace element boluses, as he has seen them perform well in cattle Although his land has no real deficiency in trace elements, other than cobalt, he wanted to see if it would make any difference to his sheep enterprise.
Afterwards, all of them underwent extraction of food boluses. Special attention was paid to the type and place of impacted food, the way of food bolus extraction, as well as to the presence or the absence of teeth and implants, previous Oesophagus diseases, accompanying diseases, the size of endoscopes, and recurrent boluses, if any.
However, the available data suggests that slow, small boluses of oxytocin in combination with uterine massage are likely to be effective.
The eating/ruminating/resting time, the number of boluses, and the frequency of defecation and urination were observed with the naked eye and were recorded.