bolus


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Related to bolus: bolus dose, bolus injection

bolus

 [bo´lus]
1. a rounded mass of food or pharmaceutical preparation ready to be swallowed, or such a mass passing through the gastrointestinal tract.
2. a concentrated mass of pharmaceutical preparation, e.g., an opaque contrast medium, given intravenously or swallowed.
3. a mass of scattering material, such as wax or paraffin, placed between the radiation source and the skin to achieve a precalculated isodose pattern in the tissue irradiated.
alimentary bolus the mass of food, made ready by mastication, that enters the esophagus at one swallow.

bo·lus (bol),

(bō'lŭs),
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use, such as a bolus dose of a drug injected intravenously.
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed, such as a bolus of barium for radiographic studies.
3. In high-energy radiation therapy, a quantity of tissue-equivalent material placed in the radiation beam, over the surface of the irradiated region, to increase the absorbed dose in the superficial tissues.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus

/bo·lus/ (bo´lus)
1. a rounded mass of food or pharmaceutical preparation ready to swallow, or such a mass passing through the gastrointestinal tract.
2. a concentrated mass of pharmaceutical preparation, e.g., an opaque contrast medium, given intravenously.
3. a mass of scattering material, such as wax or paraffin, placed between the radiation source and the skin to achieve a precalculated isodose pattern in the tissue irradiated.

bolus

[bō′ləs]
Etymology: Gk, bolos, lump
1 also called alimentary bolus, a round mass, specifically a mass of solids and semisolids that have been chewed (masticated) and mixed with saliva during the oral preparation of swallow prior to being digested.
2 a large round preparation of medicinal material for oral ingestion, usually soft and not prepackaged.
3 a dose of a medication or a contrast material, radioactive isotope, or other pharmaceutic preparation injected all at once intravenously.
4 (in radiotherapy) material used to fill in irregular body surfaces to improve dose distribution for hyperthermia or to increase the dose to the skin when high-energy photon beams are used.
5 a clumping in the stomach of ingested foreign material, often the result of habitual behavior.

bolus

(1) Any concentrate given as a single dose to achieve an immediate effect.
(2) Any mass or globule—e.g., masticated food—in transit through a tube.

Endocrinology
An extra boost of insulin given to cover expected rise in blood glucose (sugar) such as the rise that occurs after eating.

Therapeutics
A large IV dose of a drug given all at once at the beginning of treatment, which raises the concentration in the body to a therapeutic level. In treating malignancy, prolonged IV infusions may be more effective than intermittent bolus injections.
 
Vox populi
A popular term for a hyperinfusion of information—e.g., “crash” review courses before boards exams.

bolus

1. Any concentrate given as a single dose to achieve an immediate effect.
2. Any mass or blob–eg, masticated food, in transit through a tube Endocrinology An extra boost of insulin given to cover expected rise in blood glucose–sugar such as the rise that occurs after eating Therapeutics A large IV dose of a drug given “all at once” at the beginning of treatment, which raises the concentration in the body to a therapeutic level.

bo·lus

(bō'lŭs)
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use (e.g., bolus dose of an intravenously injected drug) generally followed by smaller doses.
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed (e.g., a bolus of barium for x-ray studies).
3. In high-energy radiation therapy, a quantity of tissue-equivalent material placed next to the irradiated region to increase the dose of secondary radiation to the superficial tissues.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus

1. A chewed-up quantity of food in a state ready to be swallowed.
2. The dose of a drug injected as rapidly a possible into a vein so as to be diluted as little as possible.

bolus

a soft mass of chewed food, suitable for swallowing, shaped by the tongue in the BUCCAL cavity

bo·lus

(bō'lŭs)
1. A single, relatively large quantity of a substance, usually one intended for therapeutic use (e.g., dose of an intravenous drug).
2. A masticated morsel of food or another substance ready to be swallowed.
[L. fr. G. bōlos, lump, clod]

bolus (bō´ləs),

n a mass of food ready to be swallowed or a mass passing through the intestines.

bolus

1. a rounded mass of food or pharmaceutical preparation ready to be swallowed, or such a mass passing through the gastrointestinal tract. In previous times most medication for horses was given by bolus. Called also ball.
2. a concentrated mass of pharmaceutical preparation, e.g. an opaque contrast medium, given intravenously.
3. a mass of scattering material, such as wax or paraffin, placed between the radiation source and the skin to achieve a precalculated isodose pattern in the tissue irradiated.

alimentary bolus
the mass of food, made ready by mastication, that enters the esophagus at one swallow.
intraruminal identification bolus
contain passive radiofrequency responders for individual animal identification. Used in sheep and cattle.
physic bolus
see physic (2).
purging bolus
an oldtime treatment for equine colic. Usually contained aloes or istin.
References in periodicals archive ?
A multi-centre randomised controlled trial of oxytocin (Syntocinon) 5 IU bolus and placebo infusion versus oxytocin 5 IU bolus and 40 IU infusion for the control of blood loss at elective caesarean section.
While the mean length of stay did not result in a statically significant difference, there was a significant difference in the standard deviation of the bolus group.
On the other hand, the impact of calcined bolus is special in that the 10% addition fastens the early stage of geopolymerization reaction (as the only from among all the studied additives) but this effects is lost when the addition increases to 20%), although the percentages of amorphous phase (64.
Follicular fluid FSH levels on the day of oocyte retrieval were significantly higher in the bolus FSH recipients at 13.
Numbers of boluses, numbers of total chews, ruminating time per bolus, and FVIs of growing Hanwoo steers fed different diets (1) Items Control No.
A number of processes assist in the transit of the bolus into the pharynx.
With vigilant monitoring, the basal/ bolus regimen may be adjusted upward to 110% of current dosing for a patient with frequent elevated blood glucose readings--provided the patient's glucose levels have not fallen below 80 mg/dL.
You often get the odd animal who will cough up the metal-weighted bolus, but we have never had one as awkward as this one small Friesian who had the knack of repeatedly producing them from somewhere beyond the back of his throat.
The bolus doses associated with the severe reactions have ranged from several 1,000 U of heparin to 40,000- to 50,000-U doses, Dr.
In the single bolus analysis, every swallow was initiated with 3 mL of water positioned on the tongue with the tongue tip touching the upper incisors as parameters were measured.