bolometer

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bolometer

 [bo-lom´ĕ-ter]
1. an instrument for measuring the force of the heartbeat.
2. an instrument for measuring minute degrees of radiant heat.

bo·lom·e·ter

(bō-lom'ĕ-ter),
1. An instrument for determining minute degrees of radiant heat.
2. An obsolete instrument for measuring the force of the heartbeat as distinguished from the blood pressure.
[G. bolē, a throw, a sunbeam, + metron, measure]
References in periodicals archive ?
'Ulis is thrilled with the outstanding results we have achieved in improving the response time and sensitivity of the bolometer' said Sebastien Tinnes, marketing team leader at Ulis.
Zhang et al., "Highly sensitive hot electron bolometer based on disordered graphene," Scientific Reports, vol.
A bolometer can be fabricated up to ten times smaller than the desired radiation wavelength to increase its sensitivity and to reduce its time constant.
Sensitivity in modern devices can be limited by self-generated thermal noise, so many bolometers are cryogenically cooled.
Washington, September 26 (ANI): A team of scientists has developed a "scintillating bolometer", a device that they will use in efforts to detect the dark matter of the Universe.
"Bolometers are the new kid on the block in space," providing both high sensitivity and spatial resolution for recording small temperature variations in the microwave sky, says Planck scientist Francois Bouchet of the Institute of Astrophysics in Paris.
These bolometers can gauge temperature differences in the sky as small as a ten-millionth of a degree, allowing us to shed light on places where up until now only darkness has reigned.
Modern infrared technology finally came of age in 1961 with the development of the germanium bolometer, a thin strip of germanium enclosed in a container with a lenslike aperture.
Another prominent dark matter experiment is the EDELWEISS facility in France [17] which uses high purity germanium cryogenic bolometers at milli-Kelvin temperatures.
Grossman, "Antenna-coupled niobium bolometers for mm-wave imaging arrays" in Terahertz and Gigahertz Photonics, Proceedings of SPIE, pp.
Thus, the HFI bolometers, though operating in absolute mode, can receive thermal photons from the spacecraft itself much of which is in a 50 K environment.