body language


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language

 [lang´gwij]
1. the use of a meaningful pattern of vocal sounds (or corresponding written symbols) to convey thoughts and feelings, or a system of such patterns that is understood by a group of people.
2. by extension, any of various other systems of communication that use sets of discrete symbols.
3. any of numerous sets of standardized vocabulary terms for use among health care providers in a variety of settings allowing comparisons of care across populations, settings, regions, and time. There are over 30 researched standardized health care languages. Called also standardized vocabulary.
body language the expression of thoughts or emotions by means of posture or gesture.
International Sign language a sign language composed of a blending of vocabulary signs from numerous different countries, sometimes used at international meetings and events of deaf persons; formerly called Gestuno.
natural language ordinary language as used by the speakers of that language, as opposed to a language made up for a special purpose (as for use by a computer system).
nursing language any of various sets of standardized terms and definitions for use in nursing to provide standardized descriptions, labels, and definitions for expressing the phenomena of nursing; some include category groupings of terms. The American Nurses Association has recognized twelve official languages.

bod·y lan·guage

1. the expression of thoughts and feelings by means of nonverbal bodily movements, for example, gestures, or via the symptoms of hysterical conversion;
2. communication by means of bodily signs.

body language

n.
The gestures, postures, and facial expressions by which a person manifests various physical, mental, or emotional states and communicates nonverbally with others.

body language

Etymology: AS, bodig + L, lingua, tongue
a set of nonverbal signals, including body movements, postures, gestures, spatial positions, facial expressions, and body adornment, that give expression to various physical, mental, and emotional states. See also kinesics.
An informal, often culture-independent form of communication in which emotions, feelings, motives, and thoughts are expressed by changes in facial expressions, gestures, posture, body positions, and other nonverbal signs

body language

Psychology An informal often culture-independent form of communication in which emotions, feelings, motives, and thoughts are expressed by changes in facial expressions, gestures, posture, body positions, and other nonverbal signs. See Kinesics.

bod·y lan·guage

(bod'ē lang'gwăj)
A form of communication using body movements or gestures instead of or in addition to speech or other forms of communication.

body language

The communication of information, usually of a personal nature, without the medium of speech, writing or other agreed codes. Body language involves a range of subtle or obvious physical attitudes, expressions, gestures and relative positions. It can, and often does, eloquently reflect current states of mind and attitudes towards others, whether positive or negative. Body language is often at variance with explicit verbal statement and in such cases is often the more reliable indicator.

body language

non-verbal communication that expresses a person's current physical, emotional and mental state. It includes body movements, postures, gestures, facial expressions, spatial positions, attire and other bodily adornments.

body language

the expression of feelings by means of postures or gestures. Flamboyant body language is characteristic of primates but most animal species use gestures to demonstrate their attitudes to other animals and to the environment generally.
References in periodicals archive ?
The students can get more conceptual clarification from the body language rather than words.
An example of the importance given to body language in meetings of national leaders is a media report with a picture of Obama and Putin [Pic.
He said body language was also important in the context of cultural peculiarities.
Being a born salesman and able to spot a gap in the market - he was selling rubber sponges door-to-door in Melbourne at the age of 10 - he realised there was very little information available on body language.
Teachers during the lectures use oral or written language as well as body language to transfer information.
Establish a rapport to put them at ease, and then observe their body language.
This application is recommended by body language expertby Robert Phipps,who has given his commentary and analysis of all the major party political leaders for the BBC, GMTV, ITN and Sky News as well as worked behind the scenes on many other media projects.
I also realized I had been using the power of body language by looking people in the eyes.
Nick Clegg may have been branded as the election debate winner, but according to body language experts it was Gordon brown who was the alpha male of the group.
The Body Language Handbook: How to Read Everyone's Hidden Thoughts and Intentions" is a guide to the body language that everyone gives off, whether they know it or not.
We listen to how they say things, we watch their body language, and we observe how they communicate in writing.
Sallu has hardly ever worked hard on his body language, outfits and mannerisms for most of the roles he plays in films -- apart from that of his character in his forthcoming film Veer .