body fluid


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body fluid

Etymology: AS, bodig + L, fluere, to flow
fluid contained in the three fluid compartments of the body: the plasma of the circulating blood, the interstitial fluid between the cells, and the cell fluid within the cells. See also blood plasma, interstitial fluid, extracellular fluid (ECF), intracellular fluid.
(1) Any fluid in the body including blood, urine, saliva, sputum, tears, semen, milk, or vaginal secretions
(2) A term often used with specific reference to those fluids to which health care workers might reasonably be exposed—e.g., blood, urine, saliva, semen

body fluid

1. Any fluid in the body including blood, urine, saliva, sputum, tears, semen, milk, or vaginal secretions.
2. BF is often used with specific reference to those fluids to which health care workers might reasonably be exposed including blood, urine, saliva, and semen.

body fluid

A fluid found in one of the fluid compartments of the body. The principal fluid compartments are intracellular and extracellular. A much smaller segment, the transcellular, includes fluid in the tracheobronchial tree, the gastrointestinal tract, and the bladder; cerebrospinal fluid; and the aqueous humor of the eye. The chemical composition of fluids in the various compartments is carefully regulated. In a normal 154 lb (70 kg) adult human male, 60% of total body weight (i.e., 42 L) is water; in a normal adult female is 55% of total body weight is water (39 L).
See: acid-base balance; fluid replacement; fluid balance
See also: fluid
References in periodicals archive ?
1]) The risk of infection following injuries involving contact with blood and body fluids is determined by the type of pathogen, the type of contact, the amount of blood contacted, and the amount of virus present in the patient's blood at time of contact.
The analysis of Body Fluids (BFs) is important in detecting signs of injury and infection as well as to aid in monitoring the status of diseased patients.
Any occupational exposures, including mucous membrane exposure following splash of body fluids, sustained by health care personnel should be reported as soon as possible to the facility's occupational health clinic to ensure appropriate assessment of health care personnel, and so that any systemic safety risks can be addressed.
A majority of the body fluid results (130 specimens; 62%) were reported by a medical technologist, and 80 (38%) were flagged for consultation by the hematopathologist (Table 2).
One of the challenges in analyzing extracellular body fluid miRNA is data normalization.
Leilani Collins MS MT(ASCP)SH CLS(NCA) is the Focus: Body Fluids guest editor.
This document contains "Guidelines for the handling of body fluids in the school environment.
The results of the current study demonstrated that specimens prepared from cytologic body fluids yield adequate diagnostic material for the Pathwork test and can be used in the workup of patients with unknown primary tumors," explained principal investigator pathologist Federico A.
It also helps to streamline the process of blood cells assessment in body fluid samples and increases the quality of test results.
The Cellavision body fluid application has been available on DM96 since 2008 and on DM1200 outside the USA since 2010.
The second part offers more details on methodologies, recent findings, and clinical applications of proteomic analysis of each specific type of human body fluid.
Despite the widespread practice of pathologist review of blood and body fluid smears, little is known about its impact on improving patient care.