blunt

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blunt

(blunt) having a thick or dull edge or point; not sharp.

blunt

Forensics
Referring to an object—in particular one used to strike blows against a person—which causes flatter wounds with broader regional tissue damage than that caused by a sharp object.
 
Medspeak
See Blunt dissection.
 
Vox populi
Curt, frank, coarse, rude, brusque, candid.

blunt

(blŭnt)
1. Of surgical instruments, having a smooth or rounded end.
2. Having no sharp angles, edges, or points.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gates replied to Putin's confrontational address a day later with disarming remarks about the bluntness of former spies, nostalgia for the simplicity of the Cold War and even acknowledgment that some of Washington's recent missteps (mainly in the treatment of detainees) have eroded our credibility abroad.
Now, following his triumphant 2004 return You Are the Quarry, Mozz positively revels in bluntness on his latest set.
West Ham MP Banks was noted for his sharp wit - and occasional bluntness.
Despite the bluntness with which Schimmel attacked the LA look and what critic Peter Plagens once dubbed the "aroma of Los Angeles in the sixties--newness, postcard sunset color, and intimations of aerospace profundity," (2) one could argue that "Helter Skelter" starts the way so many other stories of LA art in the '60s do: at the Chouinard Art Institute and the Ferus Gallery.
With uncharacteristic bluntness, the European Commission quickly dismissed this latest ploy as "muddled thinking".
Yet for all its bluntness and indelicate storytelling, ``Tae Guk Gi'' leaves us hotly questioning what all of the pain and angst was for.
With his bluntness and his phrase-turning acumen, presidential press conferences would become the ultimate must-see reality TV series.
She hasn't been led away in handcuffs for socking a customer in a while, but Elaine's comments on her life and career, interspersed throughout the text, still affect the bluntness of "the last of the great saloon keepers," as Holchner calls her.
The bluntness with which they hold one another accountable is astounding--in many ways it transcends the honesty and accountability to which many "older" adults aspire.
Such bluntness off the bench may explain why the former circuit chief judge and his circuit have not been given the respect of peers and jurists nationwide when compared to accolades for predecessors like Judges John Minor Wisdom and Elbert Tuttle in the old Fifth Circuit.
Written with van der Veer's usual bluntness and verve, it is a "must read.
Please forgive my bluntness, but that is quite false.