blunt

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blunt

(blunt) having a thick or dull edge or point; not sharp.

blunt

Forensics
Referring to an object—in particular one used to strike blows against a person—which causes flatter wounds with broader regional tissue damage than that caused by a sharp object.
 
Medspeak
See Blunt dissection.
 
Vox populi
Curt, frank, coarse, rude, brusque, candid.

blunt

(blŭnt)
1. Of surgical instruments, having a smooth or rounded end.
2. Having no sharp angles, edges, or points.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the bluntest of terms, it's 42 yards more important.
In the bluntest of terms, Roger emphasizes that Latinos are the biggest losers in the present mushrooming environmental debacle.
Among the essays that Yeats's widow prepared for publication after his death in 1939 one finds "the bluntest endorsement of biologist eugenics, enthusiastic anticipations of war, and an utter contempt for democracy.
To put it in the bluntest of terms, unless women give birth in a Baby Friendly hospital, there can be no certainty about what advice they may or may not have received from hospital staff.
foreign policy and delivering terror in the bluntest fashion possible.
In his bluntest comments ever on the prospect of a collapsing Labour vote, he warned the party's natural voters could stay at home and let the Conservatives in 'through the backdoor'.
His skill at combining the loftiest of moral appeals with the bluntest political rhetoric and tactics makes him an emblematic--and effective--figure in our era of highly partisan politics.
So the best thing we can do in the bluntest of terms to ensure public safety is to lock them up for as long as possible.
The remarks were his bluntest since unrest erupted in the Gaza Strip in July.
At the bluntest of levels, the willingness to suffer losses varies, a factor that helps to determine both military success and differences in combat across the world.
The bluntest instance of this problem in practice might be that of Abraham Lincoln, who was not only prepared to kill any number of actual or potential United States citizens, and to level and bombard their cities, but also ready to suspend habeas corpus and other protections, even for those who agreed with him.
US law prohibits the assassination of foreign leaders, but Fleischer's comments were the bluntest made by a senior administration official about the options of achieving "regime change" in Iraq without a war.