(redirected from blooms)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.


David, 20th-century U.S. dermatologist. See: Bloom syndrome.


an overabundant growth of algae, often resulting from nutrient enrichment.


1. the general appearance of the surface. In carcass meat it is the glistening, transparent effect and the gentle pink color that gives a good bloom to the carcass. It is the result of proper tissue hydration coupled with the correct proportions of fat, connective tissue and superficial layers of muscle.
2. appearance of the haircoat, usually taken to mean the gloss, luster and quality.
3. on stagnant water the collection of colored algae is called water bloom (see algae, algal poisoning).

Patient discussion about bloom

Q. How the fetus is influenced from Bloom syndrome? If the mother has the syndrome, what is the influence on the fetus?

A. this is from:

More discussions about bloom
References in classic literature ?
The captain swore polyglot, very polyglot, polyglot with bloom and blood, but he could do nothing.
This will I do, dear Queen, and never leave his dreary home, till the sunlight falls on flowers fair as those that bloom in our own dear land.
Tenderly they gathered them, with the night-dew fresh upon their leaves, and as they wove chanted sweet spells, and whispered fairy blessings on the bright messengers whom they sent forth to die in a dreary land, that their gentle kindred might bloom unharmed.
You might as well ask whether an old woman's wrinkled face could ever bloom again.
Heidegger; "and all of you, my respected friends, are welcome to so much of this admirable fluid as may restore to you the bloom of youth.
The colour on her cheek was like the bloom on a good apple, which is as sound at the core as it is red on the rind.
He had not been known to them as a boy; but soon after Lady Elliot's death, Sir Walter had sought the acquaintance, and though his overtures had not been met with any warmth, he had persevered in seeking it, making allowance for the modest drawing-back of youth; and, in one of their spring excursions to London, when Elizabeth was in her first bloom, Mr Elliot had been forced into the introduction.
And indeed on the Sunday fixed for this ceremony there was such a stir among the people, and such an enthusiasm among the townsfolk, that even a Frenchman, who laughs at everything at all times, could not have helped admiring the character of those honest Hollanders, who were equally ready to spend their money for the construction of a man-of-war -- that is to say, for the support of national honour -- as they were to reward the growth of a new flower, destined to bloom for one day, and to serve during that day to divert the ladies, the learned, and the curious.
She began to see the bloom upon her cheeks as valuable.
But, as Uncle Alec's experiment was intended to amuse the young folks, rather than suggest educational improvements for the consideration of the elders, she trusts that these shortcomings will be overlooked by the friends of the Eight Cousins, and she will try to make amends in a second volume, which shall attempt to show The Rose in Bloom.
It was a pretty road, running along between snug farmsteads, with now and again a bit of balsamy fir wood to drive through or a hollow where wild plums hung out their filmy bloom.
These roses are very late--they bloom after all the others have gone--and they hold all the warmth and soul of the summer come to fruition," said Owen, plucking some of the glowing, half-opened buds.

Full browser ?