bloodsucker


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bloodsucker

Microbiology
Any haematophagous organisms, classically the medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis) and related species.
 
Psychology
A popular term for a person who
(1) sucks the emotional life out of others;
(2) uses others.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in these post-Twilight days, cinema's bloodsuckers have come in from the cold to emerge as complex, misunderstood and (usually) sexually attractive heroes.
WESLEY Snipes returns as bloodsucker Blade and is handed the daunting task of saving the world by eliminating the deadly Reaper and his vampire cronies.
Interview With the Vampire,'' though, had more going for it than your average bloodsucker flick.
Felton, best known for playing villainous Draco Malfoy in the Potter series, and Greene, who plays bloodsucker Alice Cullen in the vampire films, were said to have signed up for the project.
His first assignment is to track down the ``Brooklyn Bloodsucker,'' who turns out to be an alien/spiritual leader upon whose shoulders the fate of New York rests.
The actress said that she even thinks of herself as a real-life bloodsucker.
She's torn between her duty and her feelings for the bloodsucker.
As a real bloodsucker pretending to be an actor playing a vampire in a German silent movie, Dafoe does a marvelously eccentric job of projecting menace, poignancy, cracked humor and constant to-the-bone weirdness past layers and layers of cadaverous makeup.
The ultimate film buff concept turned into a real horror movie: A great German director hires a real bloodsucker to star in his classic film.
But in a new interview, Burton, 53, revealed he identified with the bloodsucker from an early age.
DRACULA (1958)With Bela Lugosi and Max Schreck having made Bram Stoker's bloodsucker their own, Hammer recast the die by making the Transylvanian Count a sex symbol.
She played a bloodsucker in ``Interview With the Vampire'' and a brat in ``Little Women.