bloodborne pathogen


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bloodborne pathogen

A pathogen present in blood that can be transmitted to an individual who is exposed to the blood or body fluids of an infected individual. Three common bloodborne pathogens are hepatitis C, hepatitis B, and human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1).
hepatitis B; human immunodeficiency virus;
See also: pathogen
References in periodicals archive ?
Also recommended are Hepatitis B vaccinations for all employees who might be exposed to bloodborne pathogens and follow-up evaluations for Hepatitis C and HTV.
The concept requires workers to treat all blood and various other bodily fluids as if infected with HIV, hepatitis B virus, and other bloodborne pathogens.
Records regarding exposure to hazardous and infectious materials (all records associated with bloodborne pathogens and chemical exposures)
Editorial Note: Overuse of injections and unsafe injection practices may lead to large-scale transmission of bloodborne pathogens [4].
Studies have demonstrated that physicians and their staffs are at risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens because they do not follow CDC guidelines.
"Bloodborne Pathogens and Infection Control for Tattoo & Piercing Artists" is a body art industry specific course developed by experienced professional to provide the most current recommendations on prevention of bloodborne pathogens and highly contagious skin infections.
First responders (e.g., firefighters, emergency medical technicians [EMTs], and paramedics) are at risk for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens. Recently, CDC has received inquiries from state and local health departments and occupational health services about the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among first responders and the need for routine HCV testing among these workers.
There is one exception in OSHA's Bloodborne Pathogen Standard [1910.1030(d)(3)(ix)(D)]:
The first such example was the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard, which has significantly reduced occupationally transmitted hepatitis B nationally.
Since camps serve a wide population, and since people engaging in high risk behaviors are from all aspects of society and all cultures, constant vigilance must be maintained regarding bloodborne pathogen contagion risks.
Other considerations include having a HIPAA business agreement in place and ensuring proper OSHA training for bloodborne pathogens.
Although the potential for transmission of bloodborne pathogens to patients through transfusion of contaminated blood is well known, it is less widely recognized that such transmission can also occur during medical procedures involving withdrawal and reinjection of blood or blood products (e.g., nuclear medicine procedures).