blood in stool


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blood in stool

The presence of visible or clinically detectable hemoglobin in feces. Bright red blood in stool is known as hematochezia. It may be produced by anorectal disorders, such as hemorrhoids, or by bleeding from diverticuli, cancers, some forms of dysentery, or angiodysplasia of the bowel (among other causes). It sometimes results from massive bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract.
hematochezia; hematemesis; melena
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The agency is proposing to cover Cologuard once every 3 years for Medicare beneficiaries who are aged 50-85 years, asymptomatic (no signs or symptoms of colorectal disease including but not limited to lower gastrointestinal pain, blood in stool, positive guaiac fecal occult blood test or fecal immunochemical test), and at average risk to develop colorectal cancer.
Previous studies have also shown that blood in stool, whether it is occult or gross, increases the likelihood of obtaining positive stool culture.8 That was not the case in our study.
Blood in stool was identified as a strong predictor for a doctor to order a stool test in both of the GP surveys, with 80% and 91%, respectively, of GPs in the 2 surveys "always or nearly always" ordering a stool test if blood was present (10,11).
Identifies blood in stool using stool smeared on a card at home, developed in physician's office.
Moreover, many other factors besides cancer can result in traces of blood in stool, such as hemorrhoids, ulcers, or diverticulitis, or the consumption of red meat or aspirin.
Doctors searching for signs of this potentially lethal disease must rely on a test that detects blood in stool samples.
The possible effects of turpentine poisoning, which can occur when someone ingests turpentine oil or breathes in the fumes, include blood in the urine, kidney failure, loss of vision, blood in stools, vomiting of blood, and a rapid and severe decrease in blood pressure.
Most patients had mucus and blood in stools. Other common presenting symptoms included fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, bloating/distention, and irritability.
The current NHS screening programme uses a faecal occult blood test, which detects minute amounts of blood in stools - a sign of bowel cancer.
The tests the doctor performs depends on the duration and severity of the constipation, the person's age, and whether there is blood in stools, recent changes in bowel movements, or weight loss.
It may sound like a dark art, but this is actually a simple bowel screening test that detects minute traces of blood in stools - a sign of potential problems, including peptic ulcers, polyps (small non-cancerous growths) or bowel cancer.
Early detection of the disease is essential and symptoms to look out for include blood in stools, a lump in the stomach, diarrhoea or constipation lasting for two weeks or more, the feeling of still having to go to the toilet even after having emptied the bowels, pain or discomfort in the stomach area, loss of weight, and fatigue.