serum

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serum

 [se´rum] (pl. serums, se´ra) (L.)
the clear portion of any animal or plant fluid that remains after the solid elements have been separated out. The term usually refers to blood serum, the clear, straw-colored, liquid portion of the plasma that does not contain fibrinogen or blood cells, and remains fluid after clotting of blood. Blood serum from persons or animals whose bodies have built up antibodies is called antiserum or immune serum. Inoculation with such an antiserum provides temporary, or passive, immunity against the disease, and is used when a person has already been exposed to or has contracted the disease. Diseases in which passive immunization is sometimes used include diphtheria, tetanus, botulism, and gas gangrene.
antilymphocyte serum (ALS) antiserum derived from animals that have been immunized against human lymphocytes, a powerful nonspecific immunosuppressive agent that causes destruction of circulating lymphocytes.
antirabies serum antiserum obtained from the blood serum or plasma of animals immunized with rabies vaccine; used for postexposure prophylaxis against rabies if rabies immune globulin is unavailable.
blood grouping s's preparations containing particular antibodies against red cell antigens, used for blood typing. Those most commonly used are the anti-A and anti-B blood grouping serums used to determine ABO blood types and the anti-Rh blood grouping serums (anti-D, anti-C, anti-E, anti-c, and anti-e) used to determine Rh blood types.
serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) see aspartate transaminase.
serum glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (SGPT) see alanine transaminase.
immune serum antiserum.
pooled serum the mixed serum from a number of individuals.
serum sickness a hypersensitivity reaction following the administration of foreign serum or other antigens; it is marked by urticarial rashes, edema, adenitis, joint pains, high fever, and prostration. Reactions to tetanus antitoxin derived from horse serum were especially common but are now rare owing to refinement of the antigenic components.
serum sickness syndrome a serum sickness–like hypersensitivity reaction occurring after the administration of certain drugs. It is marked clinically by low-grade fever, urticaria, facial edema, pain and swelling of the joints, and lymphadenopathy, and occasionally may be associated with neuritis of the brachial plexus, guillain-barré syndrome, periarteritis nodosa, and nephritis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

se·rum

, pl.

se·rums

,

se·ra

(sē'rum, -ŭmz, -ă), Avoid the colloquial or jargonistic use of this word in the sense of 'any biologic agent' ("allergy serum") or 'any injected drug' ("truth serum").
1. A clear, watery fluid, especially that moistening the surface of serous membranes, or exuded in inflammation of any of those membranes.
2. The fluid portion of the blood obtained after removal of the fibrin clot and blood cells, distinguished from the plasma in circulating blood. Sometimes used as a synonym for antiserum or antitoxin.
[L. whey]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

serum

(sîr′əm)
n. pl. serums or sera (sîr′ə)
1. The clear yellowish fluid obtained upon separating whole blood into its solid and liquid components after it has been allowed to clot. Also called blood serum.
2. Blood serum from the tissues of immunized animals, containing antibodies and used to transfer immunity to another individual.
3. Watery fluid from animal tissue, such as that found in edema.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

serum

1. The fluid component of blood from which the coagulation factors have been removed. See Fetal bovine serum. Cf Plasma.
2. A protein-rich fluid that contains a high concentration of antibodies to a particular antigen of interest; convalescent sera–from an individual who has recuperated from a particular infection–eg, scarlet fever may be of use in treating an individual who is suffering from the same infection. See Acute phase serum, Antilymphocyte serum, Convalescent serum.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

se·rum

, pl. sera, pl. serums (sēr'ŭm, -ă, -ŭmz )
1. A clear, watery fluid, especially that moistening the surface of serous membranes, or exuded in inflammation of any of those membranes.
2. The fluid portion of the blood obtained after removal of the fibrin clot and blood cells, distinguished from the plasma in circulating blood. Sometimes used as a synonym for antiserum or antitoxin.
[L. whey]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

serum

The clear, straw-coloured fluid that separates from blood when it is allowed to clot and then to stand. Serum is blood less the red cells and the proteins which form the clot. It contains many substances in solution including sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium, chloride, bicarbonate, phosphate, albumin, globulins, amino acids, carbohydrates, vitamins, hormones, urea, creatinine, uric acid and bilirubin.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

serum

  1. see BLOOD SERUM.
  2. clear, watery animal fluid, especially that exuded by serous membranes.
  3. (also called
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Serum

Serum is blood plasma with the blood clotting proteins removed. Serum is prepared by removing blood from the subject, allowing the blood naturally to form a blood clot, and then using a centrifuge to remove the red blood cells and the blood clot. The blood clot takes the form of an indistinct clump.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

se·rum

, pl. sera, pl. serums (sēr'ŭm, -ă, -ŭmz ) Avoid the colloquial or jargonistic use of this word in the sense of 'any biologic agent' ("allergy serum") or 'any injected drug' ("truth serum").
1. Clear, watery fluid, especially that moistening the surface of serous membranes, or exuded in inflammation of any of those membranes.
2. Fluid portion of blood obtained after removal of fibrin clot and blood cells.
[L. whey]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012