blood group antigen

blood group an·ti·gen

generic term for any inherited antigen found on the surface of erythrocytes that determines a blood grouping reaction with specific antiserum; antigens of the ABO and Lewis blood groups may be found also in saliva and other body fluids; the genes controlling development of blood group antigens vary in frequency in different population and ethnic groups. See also Blood Groups Appendix.

blood group an·ti·gen

(blŭd grūp an'ti-jen)
Generic term for any inherited antigen found on the surface of erythrocytes that determines a blood grouping reaction with specific antiserum; antigens of the ABO and Lewisblood groups may be found also in saliva and other body fluids.
References in periodicals archive ?
ACKR1 was identified as a blood group antigen that was expressed on the human red blood cell surface in 1950 (22).
We would like to emphasize that comparing these observations in humans and pigs may not be appropriate, since pigs have a single RH gene, no polymorphism in the coding region of the gene has been identified and therefore, it does not appear to represent a blood group antigen for pigs [41].
Prevalence of Diego blood group antigen and the antibody in three ethnic population groups in Klang valley of Malaysia.
Among the secretor phenotype-positive rotavirus patients, no blood group antigen nor P or G genotypes (in feces specimens) were significantly overrepresented.
It is standard practice, as an additional safety check, for hospital transfusion services to re-test the blood group antigen status of blood units received into their inventory.
In contrast, the A blood group antigen, comprised of blood types A and AB, appears to be protective against diminished ovarian reserve.
The expression of blood group antigen alters during the process of cell differentiation and malignancy.
Therefore success of blood transfusion requires compatibility of two main blood group antigen systems, ABO and Rh.
Expression of the H type 1 blood group antigen during enterocytic differentiation of Caco-2 cells.
Their study shows that cells from rare individuals (Ay 1 in a million) who produce excess of this blood group antigen have dramatically reduced sensitivity to HIV infection.
5] This discovery suggested that individuals with the A blood group antigen may be more susceptible to H.
Owing to the independent inheritance of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and blood group antigen (ABO) systems, it is possible that a highly HLA-matched solid organ may be ABO incompatible.