blood glucose


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blood glucose

blood glucose

Etymology: AS, blod + OFr, livel + Gk, glykys, sweet
the concentration of glucose in the blood, represented in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood. Normal adult blood glucose levels range from 70 to 115 mg/dL (4 to 6 mmol/L), with generally higher levels after 50 years of age. A fasting serum glucose of 126 mg/dL on two or more occasions signifies diabetes mellitus. See also hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia.

blood glucose

The principal sugar produced by the body from food, especially carbohydrates, but also from proteins and fats. Glucose is the body’s major source of energy, is transported to cells via the circulation and into the cells by GLUT1 and other glucose transporters, some of which (e.g., GLUT4) are regulated by insulin.

blood glucose

Diabetology The principal sugar produced by the body from food–especially carbohydrates, but also from proteins and fats; glucose is the body's major source of energy, is transported to cells via the circulation and used by cells in the presence of insulin. See Glucose.

blood glucose

The levels of sugar in the circulating blood. Blood glucose is of critical importance in DIABETES in which the ideal of treatment is to keep the levels within the normal range of 3.5 to 5.2 mmol/l-an ideal seldom achieved.

blood glucose

(often loosely called 'blood sugar') is obtained by digestion of carbohydrates and by release from liver glycogen, and is taken up by the cells of the organs and tissues for use as an energy substrate. In healthy people, blood glucose concentration is homeo statically controlled within a fairly narrow range; maintenance of the normal level is critical for the function in particular of those tissues with an obligatory demand for glucose (brain, red blood cells, renal cortex, mammary gland and testis). Hormones involved include insulin, tending to lower blood concentration, and glucagon, glucocorticoids, adrenaline and growth hormone, tending to raise it. It seldom falls below about 5 mmol.L-1, even after prolonged fasting, and returns to this value within a couple of hours of the rise that follows a meal. When there is no uptake from the gut, about 8 g glucose per hour can be provided from the liver by breakdown of glycogen stores and by gluconeogenesis. During prolonged exercise glucose output from the liver closely matches the increased requirement, so that the blood concentration falls only when the hepatic glycogen store is depleted, close to exhaustion. See also hyperglycaemia, hypoglycaemia.

Patient discussion about blood glucose

Q. does anyone have experience with a continuous blood glucose monitor?

A. Hi Mick, i did upload following document. Even if there is no copyright on it, I would love that you respect it. Use it for yourself and share it with your friends and nothing more. Thank you! You have to understand the whole thing first about Diabetes type 1 and/or type 2:

www.pulsarsystems.ch/Diabetes.pdf

If you have any question about this article just ask me. I know this doctor personally and I wrote also already letters to newspapers about this topic which have been published.

We have to understand first what this handout express. Take it easy, I had also little difficulty to believe how simple in fact it is. People here has to understand fundamental things about food qualities. The faster you understand, the better you will manage your health and your life! Go for it Mick!

Q. what defines a person as having diabetes type 2?

A. In type 2 diabetes -- noninsulin dependent or adult-onset diabetes -- glucose levels rise because the body is resistant to the effects of insulin and the amount insulin produced by the body is insufficient to overcome this resistance. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in adults over age 40 but can develop in younger people and children. People with a family history of type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of developing the disease. Most people with type 2 diabetes are overweight and physically inactive.

Other risk factors include: history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy), polycystic ovary syndrome, high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, and history of impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. People with metabolic syndrome (a combination of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, abdominal obesity, and abnormal ability to process glucose) are also at higher risk for the disease. Hope this helps.

More discussions about blood glucose
References in periodicals archive ?
LNE certified that the blood glucose monitors developed by ForaCare Suisse AG complies with the requirements of the Directive 98/79/EC, annex IV (excluding sections 4 & 6).
The purpose of this study was to compare blood glucose concentrations in healthy, hypoglycemic, and hyperglycemic domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) as measured by a handheld human glucometer and a laboratory autoanalyzer.
If you are treating someone who uses an Accu-Chek Mobile blood glucose meter, inform them of this issue.
First, as shown previously, higher assay bias and imprecision were shown to worsen the quality of blood glucose control with the tested algorithms.
On the other hand, having low energy (low blood glucose levels) may make an individual focus more on the present.
In 1991, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) Guidelines for Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery made no recommendations related to blood glucose control in CABG patients, although the increased risk of sternal wound infections in diabetics was noted (9).
BP observed that his blood glucose levels had increased after starting dialysis.
The fasting and overall mean blood glucose levels were similar in 18 obese (defined as a body mass index greater than 27.
Blood glucose levels were 186 [+ or -] 5 mg/dL in vehicletreated mice and 170 [+ or -] 6 mg/dL in [E.
This leads to hypoglycemia (or "low blood sugar"), which decreases the availability of blood glucose as a fuel and causes the athlete to feel severely fatigued.
He reported on 577 patients without a history of diabetes whose blood glucose was measured following an 8-hour fast with in 24 hours after admission for an acute MI.
Both coffee types enabled the volunteers to control blood glucose significantly better than they did after drinking the glucose-containing water, the scientists reported in the October 2003 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.