blood gas


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blood gas

n.
1. An analysis of the dissolved gases in blood plasma, including oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide.
2. Any of the gases that become dissolved in blood plasma.

blood gas

A term that is variously defined as:
(1) Either of the major gases (CO2 and O2) in the blood.
(2) Blood gas analysis, see there.

blood gas

Clinical medicine
1. The major gases–CO2 and O2 in blood.
2. Blood gas analysis, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
The protocol design allowed for collection of blood gas samples within a 48-hour window of admission to the MICU.
Capillary blood gas analysis can be used to estimate the pH and Pa[O.sub.2], but may not be of value for calculating pC[O.sub.2] or bicarbonate.
A question was raised in our institution as to whether or not an arterial blood gas sample might see a change in partial pressure of either oxygen or carbon dioxide if the sample is placed into a pneumatic tube system with or without a bubble.
compared arterial blood gas analysis with oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry in the assessment of acute asthma.
independently of storing blood gas samples on ice or in the fridge, the Pa[O.sub.2] rose significantly at 30 min, 1 hr and at 2 hr.
The computerized blood gas evaluation tool could be valuable to anyone who needs to quickly calculate A-a gradients or bicarbonate dosing.
Many of today's automated blood gas (ABG) instruments now have internal onboard QC.
P102 = FIO2 (PB-47) = 0.21 (760-47 = 0.21 (713) = 149.7 PIO2 = partial pressure of inspired O2 FIO2 = fractional concentration of inspired O2 PB = barometric pressure 47 = partial pressure of water vapor If air bubbles are present in a blood gas sample, equilibrium of gases between the sample and air occurs, but no matter how large the bubble or no matter how much mixing is done, the combined PO2 and PCO2 can not exceed 150 mmHg at sea level and at normal barometric pressure.
The initial blood gas drawn from the infant was actually venous gas, and did not reflect the child's true metabolic state.
Summary: Looking at the current market trends as well as the promising demand status of the "Blood Gas and Electrolyte Analyzers Market", it can be projected that the future years will bring out positive outcomes.