blip

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blip

(blip)
A temporary deviation in a measurement from its baseline or its expected range.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, just because brain blips are common, that's not to say they should be completely brushed off.
stall probability = [number of stalling blips / number of applied blips] [??] 100 [%] (1)
Blips should not be confused with persistent low-level viremia, which is usually defined as detection of low levels of HIV-1 RNA in several consecutive samples.
This policy applies to blips that happen anywhere in the universe; except the policy does not apply when a claim is made in a country against which the United States of America (USA) government has imposed trade sanctions, embargoes or any similar regulations that prohibit the transaction of business with or within a country when the claim is first made.
Unlike blips, consistently detectable viremia and high-magnitude spikes (over 2000 copies/mL) in viral load remain a cause for concern, the investigators concluded, noting that more study is needed to define when such viremia should trigger a change in therapy.
A draw at Crystal Palace, a defeat to Portsmouth etc ( all put down to a blip.
Their special blip was no figment of their imagination.
By CARL MARKHAM EVERTON manager Sam Allardyce insists last week's 5-1 thrashing by Arsenal was a "blip" and that his players have moved on from the humiliation.
"Teams have runs, they have blips and they hit bad spells," said Ferguson.
"This season no one gives speeches about blips. Now they just believe they have to be better.
He's not offering an archaeology of trash culture; viewers are meant not to classify but merely to ponder the existence of these images--the tweaked cliche, the stylized art object, the dispossessed icon, the reconstituted dream, all shuffled as blips on a perpetually changing cultural landscape.
Their lurking presence is amplified by Goran Vejvoda's taped musical score, which fuses the blips and beeps of hospital machinery such as electrocardiograms and scanners with Bach, warbled speech, dripping water, revving engines, and other sounds.