blindsight


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blindsight

(blīnd′sīt′)
n.
The ability of a blind person to sense the presence of a light source.

blindsight

A clinical condition caused by occipital lobe injury, in which a person is functionally blind in part of their visual field, yet are capable of responding in part to visual stimuli.

Blindsight types
Type 1—subjects are completely unaware of any visual stimulus, but capture some features of the visual stimulus—e.g., location, or type of movement.

Type 2—subjects have some awareness (e.g., movement within the blind area), but no visual perception.

blindsight 

A term used to indicate someone who is totally blind but yet is able, unconsciously, to locate an object on the basis of visual cues. It indicates a lesion which has destroyed the visual cortex but in which the retinotectal pathway to the superior colliculus remains unaffected. This pathway is not involved in conscious vision but receives some information from the retina. See retinotectal pathway.
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References in periodicals archive ?
These results came as a surprise to the subjects who would often insist they were simply 'guessing.' This phenomenon is known as blindsight. Below we describe two of the classic case studies.
Blindsight is a phenomenon in which patients who are cortically blind can respond to visual stimuli that they do not consciously see.
Unconscious vision: New insight into the neuronal correlate of blindsight using diffusion tractography.
Each chapter describes a unique perceptual phenomenon: attention; automatic mechanisms, including aftereffects for color, motion, and tilt; singularity and multiplicity; forced seeing; looking without seeing; damage to brains, including visual agnosias and deficits such as scotomas, blindsight, and problems in allocating attention correctly, as in neglect, extinction, and Balint's syndrome; and evolutionary influences.
In agreement with this interpretation, a recent fMRI study in monkeys demonstrates that direct LGN projections to the extrastriate cortex have a critical functional contribution to blindsight with V1 lesions [151]; a human study shows a direct anatomical connection between the thalamus and the hMT+ complex, that would directly convey motion information to the hMT+, thereby bypassing the V1 [147].
We're looking inward now, not because we've grown small and timid, but because at long last we have the tools to look inward; and we see multitudes there."--Peter Watts, author of Starfish, Maelstrom, Behemoth, and Blindsight
Some of these choices will surely be read a century from now--assuming anything is--but others are already forgotten, and the best sf novel of 2006, Peter Watts's astonishing Blindsight, isn't represented.
En fenomenos como la vision ciega o blindsight, al estar danada la via comun que permite la experiencia visual [6], resulta extrana la presencia en algunas personas de reactividad respecto a estimulos, lo que permite concluir la existencia de vias distintas de asociacion visual, que permiten, en un grado mayor o menor, la conciencia de estimulos externos, en ausencia de experiencias visuales complejas.
Anne Bloom and Paul Steven Miller, Blindsight: How Te See Disabilities in Tort Litigation, 86 WASH.
For instance, an interesting study by Dutch psychologists indicates that when no relevant conscious knowledge is available, a person's behavior is sensitive to unconsciously registered emotion (as in so-called "affective blindsight").
1974 yilindaki bu olgu ile "kor gorme" ("blindsight") ilk defa bilimsel olarak tanimlanmistir.