blind

(redirected from blindly)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to blindly: Self-abhorrence, unequivocally, contemp

blind

 [blīnd]
1. not having the sense of sight.
2. pertaining to an experiment in which one or more of the groups receiving, administering, and evaluating treatment are unaware of which treatment any particular recipient is getting. See single blind, double blind, and triple blind.

blind

(blīnd),
Unable to see; without useful sight. See: blindness.
Synonym(s): masked (2)

blind

(blīnd)
adj.
1. Having a maximal visual acuity of the better eye, after correction by refractive lenses, of one-tenth normal vision or less (20/200 or less on the Snellen test).
2. Unable to see; sightless.
3. Relating to or for sightless persons.
4. Closed at one end, as a tube or sac.
5. Performed or administered without the benefit of background information that might prejudice the outcome or result.

blind′ness n.

blind

adjective
(1) Referring to the inability to see.
(2) Not well marked or easily discernible; hidden; unseen; concealed (as in one’s “blind spot”).
(3) Lacking openings for light or passage; open only at one end, as in the “blind gut” or cecum.
 
adverb Without clear vision; unaware.

noun Something that obstructs of prevents theability to see;.

verb
(1) To make blind; to deprive of vision or discernment.
(2) To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal; to deceive.

blind

Ophthalmology adjective
1. Referring to the inability to see.
2. Not well marked or easily discernible; hidden; unseen; concealed.
3. Lacking openings for light or passage; open only at one end; as in the 'blind gut' or cecum noun Inability to see; sightless.verb 1. To make blind; to deprive of vision or discernment 2. To darken; to obscure to the eye or understanding; to conceal; to deceive.

blind

(blīnd)
Unable to see; without useful sight.
See: blindness

blind 

Totally or partially unable to see.
blind spot See blind spot.
blind test See single-blind study; double-blind study.

Patient discussion about blind

Q. Why is the color draining from my eyes?! When I was little I had rich shiny cobalt blue eyes! As I grew up they faded or just started to dim in color. Being partially blind you can see in my left eye the its a really light color and creamy instead of my deep blue color... Why does my eye color dim?! I didnt think going blind had anything to do with the color of my eyes changing... Or is it something else?! Please, and thank you!

A. depends on your blindness, if it is caused by your cornea changing (corneal opacity)- it'll change your eye color to a cloudy white. it can also be caused by cataract.
are those the reason of your blindness?

More discussions about blind
References in periodicals archive ?
Well, the bottom line is that I am still making grand mistakes during my driving lessons and looks like I will take more and more of those lessons, so hope you will bear with me until I am a fully qualified driver whom people would love to follow blindly.
Whereas clinicians rightly worry about inadvertent respiratory placement of a blindly inserted tube, they also should consider whether the tube is properly positioned in the patient's gastrointestinal tract.
Conversely, Grossman also highlights rabbinic expressions of love and praise for compliant wives, insisting that, "One must not blindly accept the negative image of women as reflecting the actual attitude toward women in society and in the family" (p.
Yet we blindly follow these gurus through the trenches and into battle, amazed at the carnage brought on by slavish adherence to a set regimen or idea.
I shot blindly into a fight outside an LA punk club.
"The part about listening blindly to what your HUD lender says may strike some borrowers as a bizarre idea.
If you read the science pages of the newspaper, not all Mann's revelations will be wholly new, but his point, driven over and over again, is that European-American culture--both North and South American--is completely, blindly and adamantly ignorant of the continents they acquired.
The space is filled with recorded sounds of a middle-aged couple crashing blindly into ontological and linguistic walls, a la Samuel Beckett: "I don't want to lose you"; "You've never had me"; "Why say anything?"; "There is nothing to say." The two people start to mishear each other; the dialogue repeats with each one taking the other's role, ad infinitum.
Mastering the techniques is not difficult, since most emergency physicians know how to do these procedures blindly, Dr.
Sergeant Warner quickly entered the front door and blindly made his way through the heavy smoke up the stairs and into the second-floor hallway, where he heard the sounds of someone struggling.
Concluded Wickham, "I don't agree with all that he says, but I celebrate his refusal to join the ranks of the church zealots of the left or the right, or to blindly align himself with those politicians who pander to them."