blindism

blindism

(blīnd′ĭzm)
A repetitive behavior observed in children and toddlers who are severely visually impaired. These may include repetitive rubbing or poking of the eyes or rhythmic movements of the chest or head.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the normal development of children with visual impairment is not well known, blind children developing normally share many traits with sighted children with autism: echolalia, pronoun reversal, delay in the development of symbolic play, SIB, limited theory of mind and pretending play, and "blindism" (stereotyped, repetitive behaviours commonly observed among blind children) [16, 17].
In the place of these bulwarks of "the new color blindism," Klinkner and Smith erect a three-part analysis of the halting state of racial progress in America.
These behaviors may be termed "blindisms," since they are explainable in the context of vision impairment.