blepharoptosis


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Related to blepharoptosis: blepharospasm, blepharophimosis

blepharoptosis

 [blef″ah-rop-to´sis]
ptosis (def. 2).
Blepharoptosis. From Frazier et al., 2000.

bleph·a·rop·to·sis

, blepharoptosia (blef'ă-rop'tō-sis, -rop-tō'sē-ă),
Drooping of the superior eyelid.
Synonym(s): ptosis (2)
[blepharo- + G. ptōsis, a falling]

blepharoptosis

/bleph·a·rop·to·sis/ (blef″ah-rop-to´sis) ptosis (2).

blepharoptosis

Drooping of an upper eyelid.
 
Aetiology
Ageing, diabetes, stroke, Horner’s syndrome, muscle weakness or damage, myasthenia gravis, brain tumours or cancer, neuropathy.

bleph·a·rop·to·sis

(blef'ăr-op-tōsis)
Drooping of the upper eyelid.
Synonym(s): ptosis (2) .
[G. blepharon, eyelid + G. ptōsis, a falling]

blepharoptosis

See PTOSIS

ptosis 

Drooping of the upper eyelid causing a narrowing of the palpebral aperture. It is often divided into two main types: congenital and acquired. The congenital type present at birth is usually the result of interference with the superior division of the oculomotor nerve, or associated with the blepharophimosis syndrome. The acquired type may result from any affection of the nerve supply of the upper eyelid musculature, from a disease of the muscles themselves (e.g. myasthenia gravis), or from mechanical interference in elevating the eyelid due to the weight of a tumour, trauma or chronic tissue hypoxia (e.g. diabetes). The correction is usually surgical. Sometimes a ptosis crutch, which is attached to the spectacles and elevates the eyelid, may be useful. There are also special contact lenses designed to support the upper eyelid (Fig. P22). Syn. blepharoptosis. See hereditary spinal ataxia; epicanthus inversus; jaw-winking phenomenon; tuck procedure; pseudoptosis; Cogan's lid twitch sign; orthopaedic spectacles; Horner's syndrome.
acquired aponeurotic ptosis Ptosis caused by a partial disinsertion, dehiscence or weakness of the aponeurosis of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle. It usually occurs in old age and is bilateral, but disinsertion can result from trauma to one eye (e.g. following eye surgery). Occasionally an abnormal attachment to the superior border of the tarsal plate is present as well. This is the most common form of acquired ptosis. The typical treatment is by resection of the levator palpebrae muscle.
ptosis adiposa See dermatochalasis.
apparent ptosis See pseudoptosis.
Fig. P22 Congenital ptosisenlarge picture
Fig. P22 Congenital ptosis

bleph·a·rop·to·sis

(blef'ăr-op-tōsis)
Drooping of the upper eyelid.
Synonym(s): ptosis (2) .
[G. blepharon, eyelid + G. ptōsis, a falling]

blepharoptosis

drooping of an upper eyelid; ptosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the first cycle, her ophthalmoplegia and blepharoptosis improved.
Transcutaneous blepharoptosis surgeryadvancement of levator aponeurosis.
Technique for blepharoptosis correction using double-breasted orbicularis oculi muscle flaps.
Implications of blepharoptosis on management of patients with glaucoma
Blepharoptosis surgery is one of the most common oculoplastic procedures; the aim of which is to clear the visual axis, reducing amblyopia in young patients and improving superior visual fields in adult patients.
Treatments of blepharoptosis have been under development for more than 100 years and are still being refined.
Surgical treatment of blepharoptosis caused by chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia.
In the present study, we discuss the findings and treatment of a patient with pachydermoperiostosis, which is a rare cause of blepharoptosis.
10,11) The clinical features associated with Lenz microphthalmia syndrome are as follows: microphthalmos in all patients, developmental retardation (92%), external ear abnormalities (83%), microcephaly (83%), blepharoptosis (75%), skeletal anomalies (excluding digital anomalies, 67%), dental abnormalities of number and position (67%), digital anomalies (58%), urogenital anomalies (50%), and cleft lip and palate abnormalities (33%).