blepharoptosis


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Related to blepharoptosis: blepharospasm, blepharophimosis

blepharoptosis

 [blef″ah-rop-to´sis]
ptosis (def. 2).
Blepharoptosis. From Frazier et al., 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bleph·a·rop·to·sis

, blepharoptosia (blef'ă-rop'tō-sis, -rop-tō'sē-ă),
Drooping of the superior eyelid.
Synonym(s): ptosis (2)
[blepharo- + G. ptōsis, a falling]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

blepharoptosis

Drooping of an upper eyelid.
 
Aetiology
Ageing, diabetes, stroke, Horner’s syndrome, muscle weakness or damage, myasthenia gravis, brain tumours or cancer, neuropathy.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bleph·a·rop·to·sis

(blef'ăr-op-tōsis)
Drooping of the upper eyelid.
Synonym(s): ptosis (2) .
[G. blepharon, eyelid + G. ptōsis, a falling]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

blepharoptosis

See PTOSIS
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ptosis 

Drooping of the upper eyelid causing a narrowing of the palpebral aperture. It is often divided into two main types: congenital and acquired. The congenital type present at birth is usually the result of interference with the superior division of the oculomotor nerve, or associated with the blepharophimosis syndrome. The acquired type may result from any affection of the nerve supply of the upper eyelid musculature, from a disease of the muscles themselves (e.g. myasthenia gravis), or from mechanical interference in elevating the eyelid due to the weight of a tumour, trauma or chronic tissue hypoxia (e.g. diabetes). The correction is usually surgical. Sometimes a ptosis crutch, which is attached to the spectacles and elevates the eyelid, may be useful. There are also special contact lenses designed to support the upper eyelid (Fig. P22). Syn. blepharoptosis. See hereditary spinal ataxia; epicanthus inversus; jaw-winking phenomenon; tuck procedure; pseudoptosis; Cogan's lid twitch sign; orthopaedic spectacles; Horner's syndrome.
acquired aponeurotic ptosis Ptosis caused by a partial disinsertion, dehiscence or weakness of the aponeurosis of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle. It usually occurs in old age and is bilateral, but disinsertion can result from trauma to one eye (e.g. following eye surgery). Occasionally an abnormal attachment to the superior border of the tarsal plate is present as well. This is the most common form of acquired ptosis. The typical treatment is by resection of the levator palpebrae muscle.
ptosis adiposa See dermatochalasis.
apparent ptosis See pseudoptosis.
Fig. P22 Congenital ptosisenlarge picture
Fig. P22 Congenital ptosis
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

bleph·a·rop·to·sis

(blef'ăr-op-tōsis)
Drooping of the upper eyelid.
Synonym(s): ptosis (2) .
[G. blepharon, eyelid + G. ptōsis, a falling]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
While satisfactory results could be achieved by current blepharoptosis surgical procedures, complications were inevitable due to the unpredictable nature of ptosis surgery.[1],[2],[3] In our modification, the most notable part is to fully release the orbital fat adhesion at first and then remeasure the prolapse distance of the upper eyelid and the function of levator muscle intraoperative in the supine position.
Harvey, "The Fasanella-Servat procedure for ptosis," Evaluation and Management of Blepharoptosis, pp.
Lash ptosis in congenital and acquired blepharoptosis. Arch Ophthalmol.
Ocular comorbidities N % SE Refractive error Myopia 1831 71.27% (1.14) Hyperopia 572 15.27% (0.78) Astigmatism 1824 60.31% (1.17) Strabismus 108 3.34% (0.42) Blepharoptosis 515 14.09% (0.97) Cataract 1266 40.71% (1.50) Pterygium 224 7.05% (0.60) Corneal opacities 52 12.90% (2.17) Glaucoma 136 5.49% (0.58) Diabetic retinopathy 69 2.92% (0.46) Age-related macular degeneration 168 6.85% (0.60) The presence of cataract, pterygium, corneal opacities, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration was evaluated only in participants aged [greater than or equal to] 19 years.
Double eyelid spasm is the most common symptom of this disease, and eyelid weakness and blepharoptosis are also quite common.
Silicone rod frontalis sling for the correction of blepharoptosis. Ophthalmic Surg 1981;12:881-7.
[6] 14% (i) Blepharoptosis 14% (ii) Forehead hyperemia 4% (iii) Vitreous hemorrhage 6% (iv) Ophthalmic artery obstruction 4% Tsimpida et al.
Periorbital malformations may cause major morbidity, including intralesional bleeding, intermittent swelling, blepharoptosis, fluctuating proptosis, pain, amblyopia, chemosis, astigmatism, and strabismus.
Comparison of Mersilene mesh and autogenous fascia lata in correction of congenital blepharoptosis: a randomized clinical trial.
Diplopia, blepharoptosis, and ophthalmoplegia and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor use.
Side effects of treatment in adults include muscular weakness, neck pain, blepharoptosis, and skin tightness (Dodick et al., 2005) as well as headache, injection-site hemorrhage, and shoulder and arm pain (Mathew et al., 2005).