blepharoconjunctivitis


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blepharoconjunctivitis

 [blef″ah-ro-kon-junk″tĭ-vi´tis]
inflammation of the eyelids and conjunctiva.

bleph·a·ro·con·junc·ti·vi·tis

(blef'ă-rō-kon-jŭnk'ti-vī'tis),
Inflammation of the palpebral conjunctiva.

bleph·a·ro·con·junc·ti·vi·tis

(blef'ă-rō-kŏn-jŭngk'ti-vī'tis)
Inflammation of the palpebral conjunctiva.

blepharoconjunctivitis

Inflammation of the eyelids and of the associated conjunctiva.

blepharoconjunctivitis 

Inflammation of the conjunctiva and eyelids. See herpes simplex keratitis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Atopic blepharoconjunctivitis occurs when inflammatory disease activity at the eyelid margins traumatizes the ocular surface, aggravating keratitis and conjunctivitis.
Twenty-two percent of patients on pimecrolimus cream for atopic blepharoconjunctivitis discontinued the topical calcineurin inhibitor because of insufficient efficacy, compared with 1.6% on tacrolimus ointment.
Data Source: This was a retrospective, single-center chart review of 338 patients on long-term topical therapy for atopic blepharoconjunctivitis.
Deficient mucin production is normally an acquired condition secondary to chronic blepharoconjunctivitis (GRAHN & STOREY, 2004).
The patient first sought medical attention 11 days after the contact and had a skin condition and bacterial conjunctivitis diagnosed, which were treated with an oral antibiotic; 14 days after contact, she was noted to have two small pustular lesions on her right eyelid and had blepharoconjunctivitis diagnosed.
Pathogenesis of blepharoconjunctivitis complicating 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) therapy in a laboratory model.
Many of these conditions, such as complex cases of blepharitis, blepharoconjunctivitis, limbal and peripheral corneal infiltrates, non-perforating abrasions, and foreign bodies, can present to and be managed by an optometrist, especially those with additional supply (AS) therapeutic qualifications.
Many of these conditions can be managed by optometrists, especially those with AS and IP qualifications, and can include more complex cases of blepharitis and blepharoconjunctivitis, limbal and peripheral corneal infiltrates and non-perforating abrasions and foreign bodies.
An infectious blepharitis, if not managed properly, can easily lead to development of blepharoconjunctivitis whereby the bacteria infect the mucous membranes of the conjunctiva as well as the eyelid margins, and can also be associated with a marginal keratitis (see next article in this series).
Logically, a bacterial blepharoconjunctivitis or conjunctivitis will develop as and when the levels of bacteria exceed the protective functions of the tear film and the capacity of the tear film drainage to remove bacteria from the ocular surface.
Ocular herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection may involve the anterior and posterior parts of the eye and results in various clinical disorders including blepharoconjunctivitis, scleritis, episcleritis, keratitis, anterior uveitis, and posterior uveitis.