blepharitis


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Related to blepharitis: trachoma

blepharitis

 [blef″ah-ri´tis]
inflammation of the glands and lash follicles along the margin of the eyelids; symptoms include itching, burning, photophobia, mucous discharge, crusted eyelids, and loss of eyelashes. Warm saline compresses may be used to soften secretions, and the eyelids are cleansed thoroughly. Exudate and scales should be removed by stroking downward and sideways. Antibiotic salve or eyedrops are administered as prescribed; in some cases systemic antibiotic therapy is indicated.
angular blepharitis inflammation involving the outer angle of the eyelids.
nonulcerative blepharitis (squamous blepharitis) that in which the edge of the eyelid is covered with small white or gray scales.
ulcerative blepharitis that marked by small ulcerated areas along the eyelid margin, multiple suppurative lesions, and loss of lashes.

bleph·a·ri·tis

(blef'ă-rī'tis),
Inflammation of the eyelids.
[blepharo- + G. -itis, inflammation]

blepharitis

(blĕf′ə-rī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the eyelids.

blepharitis

Chronic inflammation of the eyelids, with secretion of sebaceous material.

Clinical findings
Redness of the eyelids, crusting at the lid margins, cysts at the lid margin, gritty sensation of the eye, reduced vision.

Management
Local cleansing, topical antibiotics.

blepharitis

Blear eye Clinical medicine Chronic inflammation of the eyelids, with secretion of sebaceous material

bleph·a·ri·tis

(blef'ă-rī'tis)
Inflammation of the eyelids.
[G. blepharon, eyelid + G. -itis, inflammation]

blepharitis

Inflammation of the eyelids. Blepharitis features redness of the lid margins, some greasy scales on the lashes, and a constant, annoying irritation. It is often associated with dandruff.

blepharitis 

Inflammation of the eyelids. The most common of these is marginal blepharitis. See meibomian glands; external hordeolum.
angular blepharitis Inflammation of the canthi, affecting especially the inner canthus.
marginal blepharitis Chronic inflammation of the eyelid margin accompanied by crusts or scales usually due to a bacterial infection (e.g. Staphylococcus aureus), an allergy, or to excessive secretion of lipid by the meibomian glands and the glands of Zeis (seborrhoeic blepharitis). The condition is commonly associated with keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Symptoms and signs include burning, itching, grittiness, and the eyelid is hyperaemic and crusted and usually worse in the morning. Treatment consists mainly of frequent cleaning of the lid margins with a cotton-tipped applicator (or face cloth or cotton ball) dipped in a diluted solution of baby shampoo; warm compresses and an antibiotic ointment (e.g. erythromycin) and occasionally systemic antibiotics such as tetracycline, especially in seborrhoeic blepharitis. In complicated cases, corticosteroids will also be used (Fig. B3). See acne rosacea; meibomian glands; glands of Zeis; meibomianitis; trichiasis.
posterior blepharitis Chronic inflammation resulting from dysfunction of the meibomian glands characterized either by excessive meibomian secretion (seborrhoeic blepharitis), which is frequently associated with seborrhoeic dermatitis involving the scalp, brows and ears, or inflammation and obstruction of the meibomian glands (meibomianitis).
seborrhoeic blepharitis See marginal blepharitis.
ulcerative blepharitis Inflammation of the eyelid margin characterized by small ulcers.
Fig. B3 Hard scales in staphylococcal blepharitisenlarge picture
Fig. B3 Hard scales in staphylococcal blepharitis

bleph·a·ri·tis

(blef'ă-rī'tis)
Inflammation of the eyelids.
[G. blepharon, eyelid + G. -itis, inflammation]
References in periodicals archive ?
The global blepharitis market segmentation is done in the following basis: end-user, treatment, type, and diagnosis.
Several diseases and conditions can cause Blepharitis. Blepharitis is often a chronic condition that is difficult to treat.
Prevalence of Eye Problems among Study Subjects Eye Problems Total n = 1265 Percentages [%] Defective Vision 172 13.6 Squamous Blepharitis 156 12.3 Conjunctivitis 59 4.7 Vernal Conjunctivitis 64 5.1 Stye 9 0.7 Squint 10 0.8 Conjunctival Xerosis 35 2.8 Total 505 39.9 Table II.
Conjunctivitis may be either primary or secondary to other ocular diseases including primary keratitis, periocular diseases, keratitis, orbital disease, blepharitis, keratoconjunctivitis, uveitis and glaucoma (Maggs et al., 2005).
At the time of diagnosis, meibomitis/MGD was present in all eyes (100%), anterior blepharitis in 40 eyes (83.3%), punctate keratopathy in 32 eyes (67%), chalazion in 24 eyes (50%), corneal neovascularization in 24 eyes (50%), and peripheral subepithelial infiltrates in 8 eyes (16.6%).
Conclusion: Chronic blepharitis is usually symptomatic, mostly mild in severity and anterior in location.
(4) The perifollicular inflammation, epithelial hyperplasia, and follicular plugging cause the clinical blepharitis. These follicular changes make the eyelash more brittle and can lead to madarosis (lash loss), misalignment, or trichiasis (lash abrasion of cornea).
Pathologic analyses of the heads of affected birds showed blepharitis and exudative sinusitis as well as severe chronic osteomyelitis of all skull bones and mandibula.
The blepharitis response rate was 90% in tacrolimus-treated patients, 79% with pimecrolimus, and 88% in the handful of patients on topical steroids.
He had also history of recurrent attacks of nonspecific blepharitis being treated frequently.
Incidence of Demodex folliculorum on the eyelash follicle in normal people and in blepharitis patients.