blastula

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blastula

 [blas´tu-lah] (pl. blas´tulae) (L.)
the usually spherical body produced by cleavage of a fertilized ovum (zygote), consisting of a single layer of cells (blastoderm) surrounding a fluid-filled cavity (blastocoele); it follows the morula stage.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

blas·tu·la

(blas'tū-lă),
An early stage of an embryo formed by the rearrangement of the blastomeres of the morula to form a hollow sphere.
[G. blastos, germ]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

blastula

(blăs′chə-lə)
n. pl. blastu·las or blastu·lae (-lē′)
An early embryonic form produced by cleavage of a fertilized ovum and consisting of a spherical layer of cells surrounding a fluid-filled cavity. Also called blastosphere.

blas′tu·lar adj.
blas′tu·la′tion (-lā′shən) n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

blastula

A hollow sphere formed during the early embryonic development of higher animals—which follows the morular stage of embryogenesis—in which dividing cells line up on the outside and are bathed by fluid within the adjacent cavity (blastocoele). In animals where cleavage involves the whole egg, the blastula consists of a ball of cells with a hollow centre.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

blas·tu·la

(blas'chŭ-lă)
An early stage of an embryo formed by the rearrangement of the blastomeres of the morula to form a hollow sphere.
[G. blastos, germ]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Blastulaclick for a larger image
Fig. 70 Blastula . Formulation of the blastula by cell cleavage.

blastula

or

blastophere

a stage in the development of an embryo, where the embryo consists of a hollow ball of cells with a central cavity (a MORULA) formed by a process of CLEAVAGE. Invagination (in-pushing of the ball at one side) of cells into the blastula gives rise to the GASTRULA. See ARCHENTERON (Fig. 44).
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Although aspects of my results are hampered by small sample size, the high-food treatment group from SC had the greatest gestational decline in brood size (39.9%) with moderate sample sizes (18 broods at the blastulae stage and 11 at the neonate stage).
Figure 3 shows the time course for incorporation of radioactive amino acids into the polysome, monosome, and soluble fractions of blastulae. After a 5-min exposure to [14.sup]C-labeled amino acids (Fig.
The kinetic data used to calculate ribosomal transit time are displayed in Figure 4 for experiments spanning therange of developmental stages analyzed in this study (early blastulae [5-day-old] and late-stage larvae [68-day-old]).
In blastulae of the Antarctic sea urchin, the majority (93%) of the 14C-amino acids synthesized into nascent peptides was found to be associated with polysomal fractions (Fig.
Previous work in our laboratory measured the amino acid composition of protein in eggs, blastulae, gastrulae, and early larval stages of S.
The physiologically active fraction of the sodium pump accounted for 12% of metabolism in blastulae and gastrulae.
In each species, recently hatched blastulae were the swimmers and unhatched blastulae the sinking embryos.
Unhatched blastulae of each species sank significantly more rapidly at 10 [degrees]C than at 14 [degrees]C (t tests: P [less than or equal to] 0.01 for each comparison) (Fig.
Reynolds numbers calculated for the blastulae in this study were in the range of 0.02-0.06.
Echinoderms swim as uniformly ciliated blastulae or gastrulne with only one cilium on each cell.
The four asteroids with very large eggs start swimming nearly 20 h later than the slowest asteroid with eggs less than 250 [micro]m in diameter, and they start to swim as gastrulae rather than as blastulae. Within the Spiralia, species with larger eggs also started swimming at later ages and stages (Table 1).