blastospore


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Related to blastospore: blastopore

blastospore

 [blas´to-spor]
a spore formed by budding, as in yeast.

blas·to·co·nid·i·um

(blas'tō-cŏ-nid'ē-ŭm),
A holoblastic conidium that is produced singly or in chains, and detached at maturity leaving a bud scar, as in the budding of a yeast cell.
Synonym(s): blastospore
[blasto- + conidium]

blastospore

(blăs′tə-spôr′)
n.
A fungal spore produced by budding.
References in periodicals archive ?
The process of host colonization initiates after penetration, with the penetrating hyphae becoming thicker and ramify within the tegument and the hemocoel of the insect, forming blastospores. The hyphae continue to grow and invade various internal organs after the death of the host and will subsequently emerge from the insect body and produce conidia that disseminate and infect other individuals (ALVES, 1998).
albicans cells (blastospores, pseudo-hyphal and hyphal cells) found in the colony dome, although the exact relationship between the colony morphology and the cellular forms that comprise it is not known.
Study of the mixing conditions in bioreactor for blastospores production of Beauveria bassiana
Transition from blastospores to hyphae is an integral part of biofilm formation.
Blastospore and hyphae were counted by observation under a phase contrast microscope, according to the criteria described by Taweechaipapong et al.
Diaphorina citri and Homalodisca vitripennis: Leaf disks (~962 [mm.sup.2]) cut to fit snugly in a 35 x 10 mm Petri dish, were sprayed with Ifr (PFR 97) to runoff (1,313 [+ or -] 257.7 blastospores [mm.sup.2]) using a Nalgene[R] aerosol sprayer (Nalge Nunc International, Rochester, New York) or water and then allowed to air dry in a fume hood.
Observation of a dermatophyte by SEM [5-9] reveals hyphae with clearly visible branches and septa or arthroconidia, whereas analysis of Candida in culture medium by SEM [10,11] often shows pseudohyphae, blastospores, budding, and a ring of bud scars.
albicans biofilm formation proceeds via at least three developmental phases: (i) early phase (0 to 11 h), involving adhesion of fungal cells to the substrate, (ii) intermediate phase (~12 to 30 h), during which the blastospores coaggregate and proliferate, forming communities while producing a carbohydrate-rich extracellular matrix (ECM), and (iii) maturation phase (~31 to 72 h), in which the fungal cells are completely encased in a thick ECM [46].
Greater thrips mortalities in curative applications than in preventive applications could be due to the active spores on the upper leaf surface (adaxial side) and their spread (via conidia or blastospores) from affected individuals to the unaffected individuals on both abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces.
The development of blue colonies after 48 h of incubation at 37[degrees]C in Chromagar[R] Medium and the distribution of blastospores along pseudomycelium observed in the microcultures (Figure 1) determined that all isolates belong to Candida tropicalis.
muscarium conidia adhere to the host cuticle through mucilage and germinate, penetrate and produce blastospores inside the nematode eggs and J2.