blastoma

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blastoma

 [blas-to´mah] (pl. blastomas, blasto´mata)
A neoplasm composed of embryonic cells derived from the blastema of an organ or tissue. adj., adj blasto´matous.

blas·to·ma

(blas-tō'mă),
A neoplasm composed chiefly or entirely of immature undifferentiated cells resembling those that form the blastema or primordium of the organ in which the tumor arose.
[blasto- + G. -oma, tumor]

blastoma

/blas·to·ma/ (blas-to´mah) pl. blastomas, blasto´mata   a neoplasm composed of embryonic cells derived from the blastema of an organ or tissue.blasto´matous

blastoma

(blă-stō′mə)
n. pl. blasto·mas or blasto·mata (-mə-tə)
A neoplasm composed of immature and undifferentiated cells.

blastoma

[blastō′mə] pl. blastomas, blastomata
Etymology: Gk, blastos + oma, tumor
a neoplasm of embryonic tissue that develops from the blastema of an organ or tissue. A blastoma derived from a number of scattered cells is pluricentric; one arising from a single cell or group of cells is unicentric. Also called blastocytoma. blastomatous [blastom′ətəs] adj.

blastoma

(1) A generic root form for any of a number of primitive tumours—e.g., ameloblastoma, glioblastoma, neuroblastoma, osteoblastoma, retinoblastoma.
(2) A nonspecific term for any tumour composed of primitive cells.
(3) Neoplasm.

blas·to·ma

(blas-tō'mă)
A neoplasm composed chiefly or entirely of immature undifferentiated cells (i.e., blast forms), with little or virtually no stroma.
Synonym(s): blastocytoma.
[blasto- + G. -oma, tumor]

blastoma

a neoplasm composed of embryonic cells derived from the blastema of an organ or tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The malignant elements differ from those seen in blastomas in that they lack the blastemal primitive appearance and histologically resemble adult-type carcinomas and sarcomas.
The glands in blastomas stain with antibodies to keratin, TTF-1, carcinoembryonic antigen, surfactant, and EMA.
Neuroendocrine differentiation is found in two-thirds of pulmonary blastomas.
Pulmonary blastomas have been shown to have [beta]-catenin mutations, varying percentages of p53 mutations, but no KRAS mutations.
While both blastomas and carcinoid tumors show neuroendocrine differentiation, carcinoid tumors do not consist of either purely glandular or biphasic glandular and sarcomatous elements.
Blastomas can be biphasic with epithelial and sarcomatous elements; however, carcinosarcomas do not show a primitive blastemal component.
In the 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) classification, (2) sarcomatoid carcinoma is used as an overall term for a spectrum of tumors that includes pleomorphic carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, giant cell carcinoma, carcinosarcoma, and blastoma.
Pulmonary blastoma is a biphasic tumor containing a malignant epithelial component resembling fetal adenocarcinoma and a primitive mesenchymal stroma, which occasionally has foci of osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, or rhabdomyosarcoma.
If a small biopsy specimen shows only a fetal adenocarcinoma pattern, one cannot exclude the possibility of a biphasic pulmonary blastoma, realizing the blastematous component may not have been sampled.
Pulmonary blastoma needs to be distinguished from pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB), which is a malignant neoplasm of childhood presenting in the lung and/or pleura.
Histologic features that allow for separation of pleomorphic carcinoma from spindle cell carcinoma, giant cell carcinoma, carcinosarcoma, and blastoma are summarized in Table 1.
Clonality and heterogeneity of pulmonary blastoma from the viewpoint of genetic alterations: a case report.