blastocyst

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Related to blastocysts: Blastocystis hominis

blastocyst

 [blas´to-sist]
the mammalian conceptus in the post-morula stage, consisting of the trophoblast and an inner cell mass.
Early blastocyst. From Dorland's, 2000.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

blas·to·cyst

(blas'tō-sist),
The modified blastula stage of mammalian embryos, consisting of the embryoblast or inner cell mass and a thin trophoblast layer enclosing the blastocystic cavity or blastocele.
[blasto- + G. kystis, bladder]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

blastocyst

(blăs′tə-sĭst′)
n.
The modified blastula that is characteristic of placental mammals. Also called blastodermic vesicle.

blas′to·cys′tic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

blastocyst

A pre-implantation embryo consisting of a thin-walled hollow sphere of 16–40 cells, which appears in early mammalian development, the wall of which is the trophoblast. The embryo proper corresponds to a mass of cells at one side, which is equivalent to the blastula.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

blas·to·cyst

(blas'tō-sist)
The modified blastula stage of mammalian embryos (including human), consisting of the embryoblast (inner cell mass) and a thin trophoblast layer enclosing the blastocystic cavity.
Synonym(s): blastodermic vesicle.
[blasto- + G. kystis, bladder]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

blastocyst

The state of the development of the embryo at about eight days after fertilization, when implantation in the wall of the womb occurs. At this stage it consists of a double-layered sphere full of fluid. The outer layer, the trophoblast, forms the placenta, the inner layer forms the future fetus.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

blastocyst

the BLASTULA of mammals, differing from that of lower vertebrates in consisting of an outer wall of cells, the TROPHOBLAST, by which the embryo implants in the uterus, and in having an inner cell mass, the embryonic disc, from which the embryo is formed.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Blastocyst

A cluster of cells representing multiple cell divisions that have occurred in the fallopian tube after successful fertilization of an ovum by a sperm. This is the developmental form which must leave the fallopian tube, enter the uterus, and implant itself in the uterus to achieve actual pregnancy.
Mentioned in: Infertility
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Birth of nine normal healthy babies following transfer of blastocysts derived from human single-pronucleate zygotes.
One such method, called blastocyst complementation, has already produced promising results.
To facilitate comparisons between the results of the present and previous studies by Capalbo et al .,[19] and Irani et al .,[21] the blastocysts were assigned a three-character score according to their exhibited degree of blastocyst expansion, and their ICM and TE grades, respectively, immediately prior to being biopsied.
Differences in the incidence of apoptosis between in vivo and in vitro produced blastocysts of farm animal species: A comparative study.
Pearson correlation coefficients between diameter and various cell numbers of bovine blastocysts are shown in Table 5.
There was no difference between reactions of fresh and frozen groups in both 2-cell and blastocyst embryos.
Trounson, "Simplified technique for differential staining of inner cell mass and trophectoderm cells of mouse and bovine blastocysts," Reproductive BioMedicine Online, vol.
Numerous previous reports have shown that higher pregnancy rates have been observed with blastocyst transfer (Day 5) than with transfers of early cleavage stage (Day 2 or Day 3) embryos [12-14].
The transfer of two blastocysts at day 5 was more favorable than two embryos at day 3 in a cohort of 164 infertile women aged <37 years in a randomized controlled trial.
Patients aged 35-37 years should first consider single-embryo transfer, and patients aged 38-40 years should receive single-blastocyst embryo transfers if euploid embryos are available, but no more than three cleavage-stage embryos or two blastocysts.