blastema

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blastema

 [blas-te´mah]
1. in species with asexual reproduction, a group of cells that give rise to a new individual.
2. in other species, a group of cells that gives rise to an organ or part in either normal development or regeneration.

blas·te·ma

(blas-tē'mă),
1. The primordial cellular mass (precursor) from which an organ or part is formed.
2. A cluster of cells competent to initiate the regeneration of a damaged or ablated structure.
[G. a sprout]

blastema

(blă-stē′mə)
n. pl. blaste·mas or blaste·mata (-mə-tə)
1. A mass of undifferentiated cells from which an organ or a body part develops, either in normal development or in the regeneration of a lost body part.
2. A structureless substance from which it was formerly believed that cells are formed.

blas·te′mal, blas′te·mat′ic (blăs′tə-măt′ĭk)(blă-stē′mĭk), blas·te′mic (blă-stē′mĭk) adj.

blastema

A group of cells in a multicellular organism which are capable of developing into a new individual by asexual reproduction or into tissues and organs by regeneration.

blas·te·ma

(blas-tē'mă)
1. The primordial cellular mass (precursor) from which an organ or part is formed.
2. A cluster of cells competent to initiate the regeneration of a damaged or ablated structure.
[G. a sprout]

blastema

an undifferentiated mass of animal cells that later forms a structure or organ either embryologically or through regeneration, e.g. the head of a flatworm.
References in periodicals archive ?
A recent study found that combinations of FGF8 and BMP7 gene therapy in neural cells in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were delivered to the limbs through the long axons of axolotls, suggesting major neural inputs of FGF and BMP in regulating blastema cell proliferation as well as controlling organ regeneration ability [22].
Wnt pathway activation of the nail stem cells appears to be required in order for blastema growth and digit tip regeneration to occur [42, 43]; however, the relationship between the nail and regeneration of theterminalphalanxisstill unclear, as there are case studies of regenerative failure even when the nail root was present.
The regeneration of a newt or salamander limb is preceded by the formation of a proliferating blastema that is guided by the AEC.
Urodele amphibians overcome this deficiency by producing more progenitor cells via dedifferentiation of terminally differentiated cells in the blastema; hence, regeneration could be enhanced in mammals by increasing mammalian dedifferentiation.
Tamura, "Nerve-dependent and -independent events in blastema formation during Xenopus froglet limb regeneration," Developmental Biology, vol.
The most significant seems to be that the worms do not dedifferentiate cells to create the blastema. Instead, planaria turn to cells called neoblasts.
Wherever planaria are cut, the neoblasts migrate to the site and form a blastema by themselves.
These mutants show impaired blastema proliferation, which is consistent with the normal gene expression in the blastema.
We performed a detailed gene expression analysis using the adult fin regenerate and found that the genes are expressed in different regions within the blastema and wound epidermis (Fig.
Looking back at previous studies, a number of reports have described domains of gene expression in the wound epidermis and blastema. A subset of cells in the basal layer of the epidermis close to the newly formed osteoblasts express shh and ptcl (Laforest et ai, 1998).
In the wound epidermis, the bmp2 and ptcl genes, in addition to being expressed in the same cells of the basal layer of the epidermis as shh, are also expressed in a subset of blastema cells at the peripheral region (Laforest et ai, 1998) that are fated to the osteoblast lineage (Smith et ai, 2006; Brown et ai, 2009).
Furthermore, Nechiporuk and Keating (2002) suggested that the blastema cells are partitioned into the proliferative proximal cells and the most distal non-proliferative cells that express msxb.