blastema


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

blastema

 [blas-te´mah]
1. in species with asexual reproduction, a group of cells that give rise to a new individual.
2. in other species, a group of cells that gives rise to an organ or part in either normal development or regeneration.

blas·te·ma

(blas-tē'mă),
1. The primordial cellular mass (precursor) from which an organ or part is formed.
2. A cluster of cells competent to initiate the regeneration of a damaged or ablated structure.
[G. a sprout]

blastema

/blas·te·ma/ (blas-te´mah) a group of cells giving rise to a new individual (in asexual reproduction) or to an organ or part (in either normal development or in regeneration).blaste´mic

blastema

(blă-stē′mə)
n. pl. blaste·mas or blaste·mata (-mə-tə)
1. A mass of undifferentiated cells from which an organ or a body part develops, either in normal development or in the regeneration of a lost body part.
2. A structureless substance from which it was formerly believed that cells are formed.

blas·te′mal, blas′te·mat′ic (blăs′tə-măt′ĭk)(blă-stē′mĭk), blas·te′mic (blă-stē′mĭk) adj.

blastema

[blastē′mə] pl. blastemas, blastemata
Etymology: Gk, bud
1 any mass of cells capable of growth and differentiation, specifically the primordial, undifferentiated cellular material from which a particular organ or tissue develops.
2 in certain animals, a group of cells capable of regenerating a lost or damaged part or creating a complete organism in asexual reproduction.
3 the budding or sprouting area of a plant. See also primordium. blastemal, blastematic, blastemic, adj.

blastema

A group of cells in a multicellular organism which are capable of developing into a new individual by asexual reproduction or into tissues and organs by regeneration.

blas·te·ma

(blas-tē'mă)
1. The primordial cellular mass (precursor) from which an organ or part is formed.
2. A cluster of cells competent to initiate the regeneration of a damaged or ablated structure.
[G. a sprout]

blastema

an undifferentiated mass of animal cells that later forms a structure or organ either embryologically or through regeneration, e.g. the head of a flatworm.

blastema

1. the primitive substance from which cells are formed.
2. a group of cells that will give rise to a new individual, in asexual reproduction, or to an organ or part, in either normal development or in regeneration.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glomeruloid bodies composed of lobulated papillary projections are seen focally and blastema is consistently absent in MA.
For some reason, people and other nonurodele vertebrates lack this ability to create a blastema.
The researchers found that the fish uses a special genetic trick that allows the acid to control the formation of blastema, which means the animal is able to produce a store of cells that can rebuild the fin.
Whereas epimorphosis involves cell proliferation, the formation of a blastema, and stem cell differentiation, morphallaxis implies the dedifferentiation and reorganization of original structures without the recruitment of cells and without massive cell proliferation (Morgan, 1901; Agata et al, 2007).
Fin regeneration is characterised by: formation of a multilayered wound epidermis, disorganisation and distal migration of mesenchymal cells proximal to the amputation plane, proliferation of these mesenchymal cells to form the regeneration blastema, continued distal blastemal proliferation to facilitate outgrowth and proximal blastemal differentiation to replace missing structures (Goss and Stagg, 1957; Santamaria and Becerra, 1991; Johnson and Weston, 1995; Poss et al.
The ureteral bud arises from the dorsal aspect of the distal mesonephric duct, which extends in a dorsocranial fashion to meet and induce differentiation of the metanephric blastema.
The middle auricular bones relate the malleus (hammer), to the condylar blastema and the temporal blastema by fibrous connections passing through the petrotympanic fissure that Rees (Rees, 1954) named the discomalleolar ligament.
Over bending and rotation of the caudal end of the embryo prevents the ureteric bud from merging with the ipsilateral metanephric blastema and thus is attracted towards the now more closer contralateral side.
When the ureteric bud prematurely divides before penetrating the metanephric blastema, this results in an incomplete duplex with ureters that meet before the bladder or a bifid renal pelvis.
1]-antitrypsin deficiency (65-67) Pleuropulmonary blastema (68,69) Malignant (particularly necrotizing cavitary) tumors-primary and metastatic (70,71) Pleural conditions Pleural blebs (7) Malignant (particularly necrotizing cavitary) tumors- mesothelioma and metastases (70,71) Systemic conditions that involve lung and pleura Endometriosis (catamenial pneumothorax) (72-74) Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (75-77) Langerhans cell histiocytosis (78,79) Connective tissue diseases--Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, (80,81) Marfan syndrome (82-84) Sarcoidosis (85-87) Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (88,89) Table 2.