blast injury


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blast in·ju·ry

tearing of lung tissue or rupture of any tissue or organ without external injury, as by the force of an explosion.
An injury due to explosions or rapid decompression, the severity of which is a direct function of the intensity of the blast wave; death is caused by exsanguination from ruptured pulmonary vessels with haemorrhage, haemoptysis, air embolism, hypoxia, and respiratory failure; other lesions include cardiac contusion, causing arrhythmia, rupture of hollow organs, cerebral injuries—parenchymal hemorrhage and air embolism—and rupture of tympanic membranes
Management Supportive; if air embolism is present, hyperbaric oxygen is indicated; other facets of blast injuries include impinging flying objects and whether the subject was submerged or free-standing at the time of the explosion

blast injury

Trauma medicine An injury due to explosions or rapid decompression, the severity of which is a direct function of the intensity of the blast wave; death is caused by exsanguination from ruptured pulmonary vessels with hemorrhage, hemoptysis, air embolism, hypoxia, and respiratory failure; other lesions include cardiac contusion, causing arrhythmia, rupture of hollow organs, cerebral injuries–parenchymal hemorrhage and air embolism, and rupture of tympanic membranes Treatment Supportive; if air embolism is present, hyperbaric oxygen is indicated; other facets of blast injuries include impinging flying objects and whether the subject was submerged or free-standing at the time of the explosion. Cf Nuclear war.

blast in·ju·ry

(blast in'jŭr-ē)
Tearing of lung tissue or rupture of abdominal viscera without external injury, as by the force of an explosion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Is blast injury a modern phenomenon?: Early historical descriptions of mining and volcanic traumatic brain injury with relevance to modern terrorist attacks and military warfare.
However, in a cross-sectional study involving 76 military personnel injured from blast injury in Southernmost Thailand, the prevalence of sensorineural hearing loss among patients in the open-, semi-open and closed space groups was 62.77%, 67.86% and 73.33%, respectively.12
also observed IED blast injury to be the most frequent cause with gradual increase over time; 71% in 1965 to 76% in 1971.4 Mader et al.
Dislocation of TMJ was observed in 4 patients (7.7%), which was believed to be caused by sudden shout by the victim of blast injury. All the four patients were followed up and they presented with complaint of pain or clicking in TMJ.
Blast injury in children: An analysis from Afghanistan and Iraq, 2002-2010.
The EMED is both retrospective and prospective; however, its inclusion of accurate dates of injury provides a platform for prospective studies on hearing loss outcomes of blast injury, including establishment of preinjury baseline and temporality.
Cardiopulmonary physiology of primary blast injury. J.
Much of the research at the Centre for Blast Injury Studies has been driven by what was happening to troops in Afghanistan.
Three (14%) of these patients (2 with a penetrating injury and 1 with a blast injury) required more than one operative procedure.
"While this type of injury and the resultant cognitive dysfunction have been described in rat studies, the clinical characteristics of blast injury in humans are not well described in the literature." This lack of data can contribute to problems some veterans with undiagnosed traumatic brain injury experience when they return to their communities.
Nurses should assume that wheezing or dyspnea associated with a blast injury is from a pulmonary contusion, and the patient should be prepared for necessary chest x-rays.
The first recorded blast injury before New Year's Day revelries was a 12-year-old boy from Cuyapo town who lost two fingers after igniting a Five Star firecracker.