blast cell


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Related to blast cell: Auer rod, band cell, blast cell leukemia

blast cell

an immature precursor cell; for example, erythroblast, lymphoblast, neuroblast.
See also: -blast.

blast cell

n.
1. A precursor of a human blood cell.
2. An immature, undifferentiated cell.

BLAST

Basic Local Alignment Search Tool. A nucleic acid- and protein-sequence comparison algorithm which is used to find matches in gene sequences and to search sequence databases for optimal local alignments to a query sequence.

BLAST uses a heuristic algorithm, seeking local alignments and creating a matrix of similarity scores for all possible pairs of residues, defining high-scoring segments, statistically evaluating the significance of the results and detecting relationships among sequences which share only isolated regions of similarity.

blast cell

Blast Hematology An immature cell in the BM's proliferative compartment, and earliest identifiable precursor of a cell line–erythroblast, lymphoblast, megakaryoblast and myeloblast; BCs are large–15-20 µm, have high N:C ratios, nuclei with fine, lacy to granular chromatin that contain one or more prominent nucleoli, basophilic, agranular cytoplasm, and abundant RNA, and actively synthesize DNA; BCs represent up to 5% of BM cells

blast cell

(blast sel)
An immature precursor cell; e.g., erythroblast, lymphoblast, neuroblast.
See also: -blast

blast cell

An immature or primitive cell from which mature, differentiated cells are derived. The term refers mainly to the progenitors of blood cells (haemopoietic cells). The presence of these in the circulating blood is a feature of acute leukaemias.
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 4: Correlation between bone marrow blast cells percentage and distinctive maturation stage of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) subgroups (p = 0.060).
It is usually used with watershed transform to segment out the blast cells and to identify the connected cells for the separation of blast cells [50].
In our series, retinopathy occurs in 40% when blast cells are less than 20%, while 60% of the patients do not develop retinopathy.
Percentages of lymphoblasts in the G0/G1 phase in 0 U/ml (without heparin), 10 and 20 U/ml heparin concentrations at 0, 1, and 2 hours (%, mean[+ or -]SD, min.-max.) Heparin 0 Time 2 (hour) 1 OU/ml 97.80[+ 97.72[+ 97.62[+ or or or- -]0.51a -]0.47 ]0.48 d g 97.0 - 97.0 - 96.9 - 98.5 98.3 98.2 10 U/ 85.38[+ 85.54[+ 90.77[+ or ml or -]4.3 or -]0.81 h b -]2.06 e 78.9 - 82.4 - 90.0 - 92.0 89.0 92.0 20 U/ 88.38[+ 76.91 [+ 78.34[+ or ml or or -]2.12 -]3.12c -]4.58f j 83.3 - 69.6 - 74.9-81.0 92.0 84.5 a-b, a-c, c-f, c-i, d-e, d-f, e-h, e-f, g-h, g-i, h-i: p<0.001, b-h: p<0.001 The mean percentage of blast cells in the G2/M phase in the different heparin concentrations at 0, 1, and 2 h are shown in Table 3.
Selective blast cell reduction in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia secondary to myelodysplastic syndrome treated with methylprednisolone.
However, the concurrent bone marrow was otherwise occupied by about 90% blast cells.
From January 2017, BM morphology suggested that blast cells gradually increased to 46%, and dendritic cells were visible.
The term 'acute' is used to describe leukemias in which a predominance of blast cells occurs in bone marrow and the term 'chronic' is used for leukemias in which there is predominance of well differentiated cells in blood and bone marrow.
Three of these four patients also had significant reductions in circulating blast cells during the treatment cycle.
Four patients were diagnosed with AML (50%) in the bone marrow of which more than 45% of blast cells were detected.
The bone marrow aspiration showed hemodiluted aspirate with blast cells. Immunophenotyping revealed 23% blast cells, positive for megakaryocyte markers (CD42b, CD41, CD61), myeloid markers (CD33), progenitor cell markers (CD117, CD34) and T cell marker--CD7 positive.