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blanch

 [blanch]
to become pale.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

blanch

(blanch)
1. To become white or pale, as skin or mucous membrane affected by vasoconstriction.
2. To whiten or bleach a surface or substance.
[O.Fr. blanchir, fr. blanc, white]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, there are several methods used for peanut blanching including microwave, dry, alkali, spin, water, and peroxide, although most of the research on blanching has been carried out on runner peanuts using hot air ovens [6].
A2 x 3 factorial design with experimental factors as two pepper drying methods (open-sun drying and use of solar dryer) and 3 levels of pepper blanching (unblanched, blanched in plain water, and blanched in 2% NaCl) were conducted.
Key words: cyanide, quality, cassava, slice thickness, cultivar, blanching, consumer preference
Other varieties, such as Utah, Monterey or Conquistador, can still be grown without blanching, though the stalks will be slightly darker with more flavor.
You can also include selected veggies and herbs in the mix when freezing tomatoes, and let the simmering tomatoes serve as the blanching liquid.
Peroxidase, a relatively thermally stable enzyme in broccoli, is currently used for measuring whether the blanching process is complete.
Indeed, I once experimented when I had stacks of beans and froze half immediately, half after blanching. There was no difference.
Before blanching and refreshing, a few guidelines should be followed: ?
The basic version consists of an infeed station, a preheating section, blanching station and a cooling section.
ASelf-blanching celery needs to be planted in blocks rather than a row as the closeness keeps the light out and helps with the blanching. Give them plenty of water to keep them tender.
This year from the golf course we have harvested over half a tonne of apples (that is a lot of peeling, chopping and blanching!) gooseberries, plums, blackberries and crab apples.
They accomplish this feat by slicing the potatoes with the peel still on, by frying them in relatively small batches and by not blanching the potatoes first as is quite common in the industry.