blade

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blade

(blād)
Working end of an instrument with special design for a particular clinical dental treatment.

blade,

blade

scalpel.

blade method
a method of castrating very young pigs in which the skin and fascia in the inguinal area are incised with a scalpel blade to gain access to the spermatic cord.
References in periodicals archive ?
In accordance with the group engagement model (Blader & Tyler, 2003a, 2003b; Tyler & Blader, 2003), process fairness will be comprehensive only when employees are treated with both interactional and procedural justice.
Steven Blader joined the firm a few years later as the fourth named partner.
Blader, the questions now are, Does the rise in hospitalizations result from "problems in the level of services provided by community care," and has "more cost shifting" of patients into Medicaid from private insurance led to or resulted from the rise in hospitalizations?
The aim of the present study is to address this shortcoming, thereby building upon the promising results reported by Tyler and colleagues (Tyler, 1999; Tyler and Blader, 2003; Tyler et al.
In addition, Tyler and Blader (2000) posit that group identification provides alternative explanations for what people mean when they say that an organization or a social institution's procedures are fair.
Unfortunately, there is much less emphasis in organizations on highlighting issues of respect and prestige - factors that drive a person's sense of their own status and would, therefore, encourage fairer treatment towards others," says NYU Stern Associate Professor of Management and Organizations Steven Blader, who co-authored the recent study with Ya-Ru Chen of Cornell University's Johnson School of Management.
Supervisors completed a 4-item scale adapted from Blader and Tyler (2009) to evaluate subordinates' extrarole behavior.
Blader analyzed came from the National Hospital Discharge Survey, and also showed that in 1996-2007, payment for the psychiatric hospitalizations underwent a significant shift away from private insurance coverage and toward an increased share of the hospitalizations paid for by government agencies, most typically Medicaid.
In addition, in this study the impact of leadership justice on the two negative organizational behaviors was explored from the social identity perspective (see review by Ashforth & Mael, 1989; Tyler & Blader, 2003).
An avid roller blader and skier, 6ft 4in James seems in rude health now, a far cry from his early days when hedonism threatened both his life and career.
BLADER is an assistant professor of psychiatry at the State University of New York at Stony Brook.