bladder retraining

bladder retraining

The use of behavioural therapy to manage an overactive bladder, which basically consists of not urinating for 10 or 15 minutes, to re-accustom the bladder to holding larger volumes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bladder retraining helps you stretch the time between feeling an urge to urinate and the time you use the bathroom.
If we've tried lifestyle measures, a patient is a healthy weight, they've tried bladder retraining and dietary measures, then it's something that can be explored."
It is likely that therapies directed at "urinary" (antimuscarinics, pyridium, bladder retraining), "organ specific" (pyridium, intravesical GAGs, DMSO, lidocaine, pentosan polysulfate sodium, quercetin) and "neurogenic" (amitriptyline, gabapentinoids, system specific therapies, specialist referral for systemic disorders) domains may be more effective overall in the female UCPPS population compared to males.
Supervised pelvic floor muscle training with specialized physiotherapists for a minimum of three to six months can also help as can bladder retraining. There are also medications that can help relax the bladder.
The patient was prescribed a [beta]3 agonist, pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and bladder retraining. Four months later, she noticed some degree of improvement, but had stopped the treatment as she felt that she had no time for PFMT.
(6) If the patient's symptoms are certain, minimal evaluation is needed and it is reasonable to proceed with first-line therapy, which includes fluid management (decreasing caffeine intake and limiting evening fluid intake), bladder retraining drills such as timed voiding, and improving pelvic floor muscles with the use of biofeedback and functional electrical stimulation.
Your doctor may recommend bladder retraining, in which you learn to resist the urge to urinate and then urinate at set times.
Your GP can assess whether you have incontinence, decide which type you have, give general advice on controlling symptoms, provide information on pelvic floor exercises and bladder retraining, and give treatment with prescribed medicines.
If skilled nursing facility staff members believe that bladder disorders are a normal part of aging, they may be less likely to vigorously pursue a non-pharmacological UI treatment program, such as scheduled voiding or bladder retraining. Recognition that bladder disorders are not a normal part of aging, along with an appreciation for the negative impact on the resident's quality of life, should aid in increased value of and use of these management and treatment programs in the resident care plan.
For irritable bladder, there's bladder retraining and muscle relaxant drugs.
However, it is recommended treatment for urge incontinence begin with six weeks of bladder retraining before moving on to drug therapy.
Behavioural interventions including urge suppression strategies, delayed voiding and bladder retraining are widely recognised in managing UUI.