blackleg

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blackleg

(blăk′lĕg′)
n.
An infectious, usually fatal bacterial disease of cattle and sometimes of sheep, goats, and swine, caused by Clostridium chauvoei and characterized by gas-containing swellings in the musculature.
Veterinary medicine An often lethal disease of young calves and sheep, characterised by a settling of gelatinous matter in the extremities and neck caused by Clostridium chauvoei, the spores of which can live in the soil for years and which are ingested and enter the blood via defects in the gastrointestinal mucosa

blackleg

an acute, infectious myositis principally of cattle, caused by Clostridium chauvoei. The lesion arises without the need for any external injury. The animal is profoundly toxemic with a high fever and usually a very swollen painful thigh. The skin is gangrenous, and emphysema can be palpated in the subcutis. Death occurs in 12 to 36 hours.

pseudo-blackleg
see malignant edema. Called also gas gangrene.
stable blackleg
see malignant edema. Called also gas gangrene.
References in periodicals archive ?
Routine use of polymerase chain reaction testing and automatic electronic laboratory reporting likely contributed to the increased reported incidence of confirmed babesiosis in Wisconsin; however, evidence of blacklegged tick expansion suggests an actual increase in infection rates.
Only 26% of LD patients in Nova Scotia recalled a tick bite, consistent with US data where 84% and 86% of patients with EM and Lyme arthritis, respectively, failed to recall exposure to blacklegged ticks (18-21).
A study published in Experimental and Applied Acarology found that spraying outdoor areas with Safer-brand organic insecticidal soap in spring, when blacklegged deer tick nymphs are active, can provide treatment that is equally as effective as spraying with the insecticide chlorpyrifos.
Keywords: Blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, Lyme disease, Indiana
Also of great concern with blacklegged ticks is that they are dispersing from areas where the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease is present in the population.
Blacklegged ticks, the only ticks that carry Lyme disease, are identified by the red-orange crescent shield on their backs.
The blacklegged tick and the Western blacklegged tick are carriers of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, the type responsible for more cases in the Western United States.
While the exhausting-to-watch workrate of Martin O'Connor and Graham Hyde would have had them blacklegged down Longbridge way a couple of decades ago, Blues need more than Trojans in the midfield area.
But I was blacklegged because I was working much better and faster than the others and getting bigger bonuses," he says.
Similarly, if you live in an area with a high incidence of the disease and find a tick on you, and it can be identified as a deer tick (or western blacklegged tick, if you're in California), your doctor may put you on antibiotics, even if you have no symptoms.
Blacklegged deer ticks can spread Lyme disease to pets, which causes fever, decreased appetite, painful joints, limping and lethargy.
Blacklegged ticks live in moist and humid environments, particularly in or near wooded or grassy areas.