black-legged tick


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Related to black-legged tick: American dog tick, lone star tick

black-legged tick

(blăk′lĕgd′)
n.

black-legged tick

see ixodes.
References in periodicals archive ?
ANAPLASMOSIS most often is transmitted by the black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) in the Northeast and upper Midwest and the western black-legged tick (I.
Black-legged ticks are tiny and often go unnoticed.
Klun showed that adult black-legged ticks responded to substances associated with external glands found on the legs of white-tailed deer; they remained stationary on surfaces on which the glands had been rubbed.
The roles of birds, lizards, and rodents as hosts for the western black-legged tick Ixodes pacificus.
High SNP density in the black-legged tick, Ixodes scapularis, the principal vector of LD spirochetes.
A human can contract the disease, which primarily is found on the East Coast and in the Pacific Northwest, when an infected Western black-legged tick feeds on a human for 12 to 24 hours, health officials said.
In the northeastern United States, the vector of this disease is Ixodes scapularis, the black-legged tick, which is also the primary vector of Borrelia burgdorferi and Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the causal agents of Lyme disease and human granulocytic anaplasmosis, respectively.
Lyme disease is spread by two ticks -- the deer tick and the black-legged tick.
Immediate and persistent tick killing activity for 12 weeks (Ixodes scapularis - black-legged tick, Dermacentor variabilis - American dog tick, and Rhipicephalus sanguineus - brown dog tick)
The black-legged tick is a vector of Lyme disease, babesiosis and anaplasmosis,[2] and the Lone star tick may carry bacteria that cause ehrlichiosis and tularemia.
For Lyme borreliosis in eastern North America, black-legged tick (Ixodes scapularis) larvae acquire Borrelia burgdorferi from a reservoir host during their first blood meal.
To the Editor: Ixodes scapularis, the black-legged tick, is the predominant vector of reportable human vectorborne disease in the United States.