black-box technology

black-box technology

A generic term for a “black box” or telematics device in one’s car which, by monitoring unsafe activity—e.g., sudden braking or cornering—provides feedback to both driver and insurer, which can be used to increase safe driving practices and calculate future insurance premiums.
References in periodicals archive ?
The companys technology integrates military grade security and encryption with banking grade black-box technology, with their products being sold to governments and private companies across the world.
Company director Steve Cole said although black-box technology that monitored company vehicles had been around for some time, this new software could monitor the movement of employees travelling on public transport, in private vehicles or on foot.
Smartphone applications, with GPS, already in widespread use, may offer a less expensive alternative to black-box technology but deliver similar data without investment in hardware.
The 'Driving ECO2nomy' scheme' will utilise black-box technology to evaluate a driver's skill and then, after eco-driving training, show the fuel saving possibility.
NORWICH Union's pilot scheme for pay-as-you-drive insurance via black-box technology makes enormous sense.
No hazardous chemicals, rods, high voltage, or black-box technology are required, and the bimetallic process media is 100% recyclable.
"Black-box technology can help employers monitor the way people are driving and allow them to spot speeders and erratic drivers.
In your story on automotive black-box technology in the October issue, I have to agree with New York Times columnist William Safire--I don't want a car that rats on me.
Less-qualified personnel will be performing this testing due to black-box technology. The instrument will double-check everything.
It recommended the use of black-box technology that is used in planes and cars to record critical data on the amount of oxygen, methane, carbon monoxide and coal dust in the underground mines.